Saturday, 31 March 2012

HM COASTGUARD REMINDS DIVERS TO STOP

After two divers suffered decompression sickness this afternoon following rapid ascents, HM Coastguard would like to remind all divers of the importance of regular stops as they come to the surface.

In the first incident Milford Haven Coastguard received a 999 call from Swansea Divers reporting that one of their divers was suffering decompression sickness on Dale Slipway Pembrokeshire. The Duty Diving Medical Officer gave advice and Dale Coastguard Rescue Team provided initial first aid. The diver was taken to the hyperbaric chamber in Plymouth by the RAF Rescue helicopter based at Chivenor.

In the second incident at just after 1.15pm Plymouth diver called MRCC Brixham to tell them that one of their divers was possibly suffering from a decompression problem after missing stops while diving at St Johns Lake, Plymouth. Following medical advice the diver was taken by ambulance to the hyperbaric chamber.
 
H.M Coastguard advises that dives requiring decompression stops should be planned beforehand and taken. Any diver who has missed planned decompression stops could suffer from decompression illness

Divers are also advised to make sure they are adequately qualified and experienced for the dive they plan to undertake and keep a close eye on weather and sea conditions. Their personal fitness is a top priority for safe diving and they should be familiar with new or different gear before planning deep dives.

If you are operating a dive boat check do a radio check with the Coastguard before heading out and tell the Coastguard your planned destination and expected return time. If one of your divers has a problem contact the Coastguard straightaway.

-Ends-

Wednesday, 28 March 2012

RUSSIAN MASTER PROSECUTED FOR GROUNDING ON NORTH UIST AND FAILING A BREATH TEST

On 22 March 2012 the master of the  Dutch cargo ship ‘Flinterspirit' was arrested and charged with breach of the Railways and Transport Security Act 2003.  The master had grounded his vessel on Flodday Mor on the 19 March 2012 and failed a routine breath test two days later.

The ‘Flinterspirit’ was on a voyage from Pori, Finland to Belfast when the vessel grounded on Flodday Mor, North Uist at (Greenwich Mean Time) on the 19 March 2012. The vessel’s time was one hour ahead of GMT and the second mate was due to take over the watch from the master. The second mate felt a judder and rushed up to the bridge; there was no one there. The second mate called the chief mate to the bridge and together they sounded the general alarm. When the master still did not appear the second mate went down to his cabin where he found him in bed.

The chief and second mate contacted the coastguard and carried out an inspection of the ship’s ballast tanks. They discovered that the fore peak tank and the bow thrust compartment were both flooded.

The ship was on a rising tide and the ship’s officer’s de-ballasted number three and number one ballast tanks, at approximately on the 20 March the ship floated free. The vessel was brought to Stornoway so divers could carry out an underwater inspection, however bad weather prevented it from being berthed until the 22 March.

At court in Stornoway on 28 March 2012 the master Konstantin Gobulev pleaded guilty to being over the limit for alcohol on 22 March 2012. He also pleaded guilty to a breach of the Merchant Shipping Act 1995 section 58 (2)(b)(i) by failing to properly navigate his ship.

The Master was fined a total of £3,500

On summing up the Sheriff said:

“The consequences could have been far more serious I have accepted your early plea but, serious matters of public safety have been raised.”

David Carlisle, Principal Surveyor, Belfast Marine Office, Maritime and Coastguard Agency, said:

“This was another serious breach of the Collision Regulations. We do not know why the master left the bridge but to do so while the ship was transiting the Minches was reckless in the extreme. It was not possible to determine, at this stage, whether or not alcohol was a contributory factor at the time of the grounding, but it cannot be ignored that the master was four times over the limit some two days later when the ship berthed. This case demonstrates a flagrant disregard for the principles of good seamanship.”

Notes to Editors

  • The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities.  Sea Vision promotes the importance and economic value of the sector and works to highlight the exciting range of activities and career opportunities available to young people within the UK growing maritime sector. www.seavisionuk.org

  • Follow us on Twitter. We can be found at  MCA_media
                                                                                             

Tuesday, 27 March 2012

MOTHER AND DAUGHTER RESCUED FROM CLIFFS AFTER BEING CUT OFF BY TIDE

A mother and her 26-year-old daughter were rescued from cliffs near Westward Ho! this evening after they became cut off by the tide during a walk.
The two had been walking from Westward Ho! towards Abbotsham and had turned back to walk along the beach when they realised that the tide had come in and cut them off. They climbed as far up the cliff as was safe, called 999 and spoke to Swansea Coastguard. The Coastguard sent the Westward Ho! Coastguard Rescue Team to the scene. The Appledore RNLI lifeboat, which was already out along the coast also offered its assistance. By chance the RAF rescue helicopter from Chivenor was also out on exercise and so it went to the scene.
The lifeboat soon spotted the two women on the cliff and was able to guide the helicopter towards them. The two women were then airlifted to the top of the cliff.
Bev Haigh, Swansea Coastguard Watch Manager says:
“We always advise people to check tide times before setting out along the coast – this information is readily available on the web. Although these women were caught out by the tide, they did exactly the right thing by getting themselves to a safe place and calling the Coastguard. They could easily have attempted to climb the grassy cliff, but sensibly, especially with the advancing darkness, they called for help instead.”

Monday, 26 March 2012

FIFTEEN FOREIGN FLAGGED SHIPS DETAINED IN THE UK DURING FEBRUARY 2012

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) announced today that 15 foreign flagged ships were under detention in UK ports during February 2012 after failing Port State Control (PSC) inspection.

Latest monthly figures show that there were nine new detentions of foreign flagged ships in UK ports during February 2012 and six vessels remained under detention from previous months. The overall rate of detentions compared with inspections carried out over the last twelve months was 2.32% this is slightly down from January’s twelve month rate.

Out of the detained vessels seven were registered with a flag state listed on the Paris MOU white list, two were registered with a flag state on the grey list four were registered with a flag state on the black list and two were unregistered.

-Ends-

Notes to Editors

1.In response to one of the recommendations of Lord Donaldson's Inquiry into the prevention of pollution from merchant shipping and in compliance with the EU Directive on Port State Control (2009/16/EC as amended), the Maritime and Coastguard agency (MCA) publishes full details of the foreign flagged vessels detained in UK ports each month.

2. Inspections of foreign flagged ships in UK ports are undertaken by surveyors from the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. Where a ship is found to be deficient or lacks the required documentation, Maritime and Coastguard Agency surveyors can take a range of actions leading to detention in serious cases. The UK is part of a regional agreement on port state control known as the Paris Memorandum of Understanding on Port State Control (Paris MOU) and information on all ships that are inspected is held centrally in an electronic database known as Thetis. This allows the ships of flags with poor detention records to be targeted for future inspection.

3. Detained ships have to satisfy surveyors that remedial work has been carried out before they are allowed to leave port.

4. When applicable the list includes those passenger craft prevented from operating under the provisions of the EU Directive on Mandatory Surveys for the safe operation of regular Ro-Ro ferry and high speed passenger craft services (1999/35/EU).

Notes on the list of detentions
• Full details of the ship.
• The accompanying detention list shows ship’s name, the flag state and the ship’s International Maritime Organization (IMO) number which is unchanging throughout the ship’s life and uniquely identifies it.
• Company.
• The company shown in the vessel’s Safety Management Certificate or the party otherwise believed to be responsible for the safety of the ship at the time of inspection.
• Classification Society.
• The list shows the Classification Society responsible for classing the ship and not necessarily the party issuing and/or carrying out surveys for certificates relevant to the defect found.
• Recognised Organisation.
• The "organisation” - responsible for conducting the statutory surveys: and issuing statutory certificates, (on behalf of the Flag State).
• Defects.
The list gives a summary of the main grounds for detention and includes information where the ship has been released to sail to another port for repairs.


SHIPS DETAINED IN FEBRUARY 2012

Date and Place of detention: 1 February 2012 Dagenham
Vessel name: - Symphorine (Ro- Ro Cargo)
GT: - 10030
IMO No: - 8302791
Flag: Luxembourg
Company: - Euroship Services Ltd
Classification Society: - Det Norske Veritas DNV / Bureaus Veritas (BV)
Recognised Organisation: - Det Norske Veritas (DNV)
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - Bureau Veritas (BV)
Summary: - 10 deficiencies; 3 grounds for detention

The vessel was detained in Dagenham for 2 days because the oily water separator was inoperative, in addition the chief engineer and 3rd engineer were unable to demonstrate its operation. The number and nature of the deficiencies were objective evidence of a serious failure of the lack of effectiveness of the implementation of the ISM code. Other deficiencies found included: the signage for the escape routes were not properly marked; the oil filtering equipment flanges were disconnected and the bilge pumping arrangement was inoperative; a child’s life jacket did not have IMO marking and the lights were not working on the lifebuoys.
The vessel was released from detention on 2 February 2012

Date and Place of detention: - 6 February 2012 Southampton
Vessel name: - Deep Diver 1 (Drilling Barge)
GT: - 772
IMO No: - 7518006
Flag: - St Vincent and the Grenadines
Company: - Seacore Ltd
Classification Society: - International Naval Surveys Bureau (INSB)
Recognised Organisation: - N/A
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - N/A
Summary: - 8 deficiencies; 3 grounds for detention
The vessel was detained in Southampton for 6 days because there was no safe access to the deck as there was no safety net rigged and the gangway was twisted and damaged, the cleanliness of the engine room was insufficient there was oil in the bilges and the machinery was leaking oil. Other deficiencies identified included: the life saving appliances were not in position a fire hose was missing from the machinery space; floors and frames were corroded on the bridge structure and various deck lighting was inoperative.
The vessel was released from detention on 11 February 2012.

Date and Place of detention: 7 February 2012 Cardiff
Vessel Name: Avalon (General Cargo)
GT: - 2,545
IMO No: - 9387322
Flag: - Netherlands
Company: - Rederij Van Lent
Classification Society: - Bureau Veritas (BV)
Recognised Organisation: - Bureau Veritas (BV)
Recognised Organisation for ISM: -Bureau Veritas (BV)
Summary: - 24 deficiencies; 3 grounds for detention
The vessel was detained in Cardiff for 6 days because there was extensive evidence that the safety management system was not operational. The identified deficiencies included: nautical publications had not been corrected up to date and records of previous corrections not kept; the hours of rest for the chief officer for a period during January 2012 was less than the required 10 hours per day; the GMDSS log had not been completed correctly and the fire drill and the abandon ship drill demonstrated a lack of emergency preparedness.
The vessel was released from detention on 11 February 2012.


Date and Place of detention: -8 February 2012 Harwich
Vessel Name: - Sauria (Oil Tanker)
GT: - 362
IMO No: - 4902945
Flag: - Sierra Leone
Company: - Allentone Supplies
Classification Society: - International Register of Shipping (IRS)
Recognised Organisation: - International Register of Shipping (IRS)
Summary: -16 deficiencies; 2 grounds for detention
The vessel was detained in Harwich for 17 days because the vessel, an oil tanker was operating without a valid International Oil Pollution Prevention (IOPP) certificate, the satellite EPIRB was out of order, the battery had expired and the holding base was broken. In addition there was no valid certificate of registry and the master and officers did not hold flag state endorsements; there was no safe means of access for boarding the vessel; there was poor lighting in the escape way from accommodation to the poop deck and the stern light lens was cracked.
The vessel was released from detention on 24 February 2012.

Date and Place of detention 12 February 2012 Southampton
Vessel Name: -Visily Shukshin (General Cargo)
GT: - 2,506
IMO No: - 9057288
Flag: - Malta
Company: - Inok NV
Classification Society: - Russian Maritime Register of Shipping (RMRS)
Recognised Organisation: - Russian Maritime Register of Shipping (RMRS)
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - Russian Maritime Register of Shipping (RMRS
Summary: - 10 deficiencies; 2 grounds for detention
The vessel was detained in Southampton for 4 days because the passage planning carried out by navigation officers did not use paper charts for voyage planning or navigating and there were unapproved Electronic Chart Systems (ECS) in use with uncorrected other charts. Identified deficiencies were objective evidence of a serious lack of familiarity with the company Safety Management System (SMS) Other deficiencies identified included: there was no records of testing the auto – start on the emergency generator; there were no compass deviations taken since October 2011; flour had been spilt in the stores and the fridges were not clean, in addition the latch was not holding on the freezer door; the medical equipment carried was in excess of the minimum statutory requirements and the seals on some of the equipment was broken.
The vessel was released from detention on 15 February 2012.

Date and Place of detention: 13 February 2012 Avonmouth
Vessel Name: - Seahawk (General Cargo)
GT: - 1,959
IMO No: - 8906250
Flag: - Barbados
Company: -Torbulk Ltd
Classification Society: Lloyds Register of Shipping (LR)
Recognised Organisation: Lloyds Register of Shipping (LR)
Recognised Organisation for ISM: Lloyds Register of Shipping (LR)
Summary 7 deficiencies; 1 ground for detention
The vessel was detained in Avonmouth following an engine room fire and total loss of power. On releasing the anchor to prevent drift, the cable failed, the other anchor crown was missing and the vessel was towed to Avonmouth. The inspection revealed objective evidence of the failure of the implementation of the ISM code.
The vessel was still detained at 29 February 2012


Date and Place of detention: - 15 February 2012 Southampton
Vessel Name: -Tera (General Cargo)
GT: 1,861
IMO No: - 8411506
Flag: - Antigua & Barbuda
Company: - Africa Marine Ltd
Classification Society: - Bureau Veritas (BV)
Recognised Organisation: -Bureau Veritas (BV) / Russian Maritime Register of Shipping (RMRS)
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - Bureau Veritas (BV)
Summary: -19 deficiencies; 1 ground for detention

The vessel was detained in Southampton for 4 days because the deficiencies identified indicated significant failings in the implementation of the requirements of the ISM code. Deficiencies included: several sections of the ship’s railings were damaged including pilot access to the port side; there were no charts available for the intended voyage and the passage plan was not as required; in addition there was an unapproved Electronic Chart System (ECS) in use on the bridge for navigation, there were no records of rest recorded for January and February and the records for December 2011 had been falsified.
The vessel was released from detention on 18 February 2012


Date and Place of detention: 20 February 2012 Ipswich
Vessel name: - Barizo (Other Cargo)
GT: - 2,999
IMO No: - 9188946
Flag: - Spain
Company: - Naviera Murueta
Classification Society: - Lloyds Register of Shipping (LR)
Recognised Organisation: - N/A
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - N/A
Summary: - 7 deficiencies; 3 grounds for detention
The vessel was detained in Ipswich for 5 days because the propulsion main engine and pitch controller was malfunctioning, the number and nature of operational deficiencies show a major failure of the Safety Management System (SMS). Other deficiencies identified included: the gyro compass had a 5° error when the vessel was entering port; the magnetic compass was not secured in its cradle; the bridge team was not familiar with the bridge equipment; the hull was damaged resulting in distortion on the hull on the port side, this was a deficiency recorded at the previous inspection in France.
The vessel was released from detention on 24 February 2012

Date and Place of detention: - 29 February 2012 Southampton
Vessel name: - Eos (General Cargo)
GT: - 700
IMO No: - 8213445
Flag: - Moldova
Company: - Coaster Maritime SA
Classification Society: - Maritime Bureau of Shipping (MBS)
Recognised Organisation: - N/A
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - N/A
Summary: - 28 deficiencies; 1 ground for detention
The vessel was detained in Southampton because the number and nature of the deficiencies identified indicated significant failures in the application of the ISM code. Deficiencies included: safe means of access to the vessel was not provided; the pilot ladder was in a poor condition and a step was broken; the ship security officer was not certified for the role; passage planning had not been carried out for previous or forthcoming voyages; the master’s hours of rest not recorded; the engine room funnel dampers port and starboard coaming was holed and had significant corrosion; there was a lack of fresh fruit, meat and vegetables on board; the fresh water tank was holed and plugged with wooden plugs and the deficiencies identified at the previous port state inspection had not been corrected as required.
The vessel was still detained at 29 February 2012

DENTENTIONS CARRIED OVER FROM PREVIOUS MONTHS

Date & Place of detention: - 25 January 2012-Falmouth
Vessel name: - Pegasus (Bulk Carrier)
GT: - 17,630
IMO No: - 9052733
Flag: - Kiribati
Company: Tristar Management Ltd.,
Classification Society: Bureau Veritas (BV)
Recognised Organisation: - Bureau Veritas (BV)
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - Bureau Veritas (BV)
Summary: - 17 deficiencies; 4 grounds for detention
The vessel was detained in Falmouth for 13 days because, the louvres for the engine room funnel and fire dampers had broken linkages and could not be closed properly; the fire drill showed lack of training and knowledge; the launching arrangements for the rescue boats was not as required and the deficiencies identified marked ISM are evidence of a serious failure or lack of effectiveness of the implementation of the ISM code. In addition there were many areas of the ship that were dirty with garbage, dirt and soot accumulations; the cold room had a corroded seal and there was meat stored uncovered; the engine room workshop structural fire protection was inadequate; there were oil drums containing oil above the emergency generator space which were a fire and pollution hazard and the engine room hatches closing appliances were not fully operable.
The vessel was released from detention on 6 February 2012

Date & Place of detention: 1 November 2011 Marchwood Southampton
Vessel name: - Wadestone (Cargo Barge)
GT: - 274
IMO No: 7830545
Flag: - Sierra Leone
Company: - Britannia Shipping Ltd
Classification Society: - Not Known
Summary: - Nine deficiencies; 7 grounds for detention
The vessel was detained in Marchwood because the vessel had suffered serious hull damage resulting in the flooding of the forepeak tank space; the vessel had no valid certification on board from the flag state; there was no load certificate on board or approved stability book from the flag state. Other deficiencies were one crewman had no endorsement for equivalency on his certificate of competency; the master had no valid certification for the type of craft and the vessel had no passage plan.
The vessel was still detained at 29 February 2012

Date & Place of detention: 10 October 2011 Portland
Vessel name: - Westwind II
GT: - 3,539
IMO No: 8515635
Flag: - Panama
Company: -Reederei Karl-Heinz
Classification Society: - Turku Lloyd (TL)
Summary: - 16 deficiencies; 16 grounds for detention
The vessel was detained in Portland because it did not have valid certificates on board; the main engine did not have guards around moving parts; some fire fighting equipment had corroded wires securing the fittings; lifeboat boarding ladder ropes were rotted and unsafe; identified deficiencies were objective evidence of a serious failure or lack of effectiveness of the implementation of the ISM Code.
The vessel was still detained at 29 February 2012

Date and Place of detention: 8 November 2010 – Birkenhead
Vessel Name: - MOST SKY General Cargo
GT: - 1,972
IMO No: - 9389370
Flag: Panama
Company: ER Em Denizcilik
Classification Society: - Russian Maritime Register of Shipping (RMRS)
Summary: - 12 deficiencies; 4 grounds for detention
The vessel was detained in Birkenhead because the engine room was very dirty, there were fuel oil leaks and a major non conformity was identified with respect to the lack of maintenance of the ship and equipment. Other deficiencies identified included: the crew/officers records of rest were not signed; the crew accommodation was no longer provided with steam heating; the galley needed cleaning; there was insufficient fruit and vegetables on board; the crew showers and toilets were dirty and the shower curtains missing and the laundry washing facilities were inadequate. In addition the lifejacket lights were out of date; the aft deck was slippery underneath the deck generator and several fire doors were tied open.
The vessel was still detained at 29 February 2012

Date and Place of detention: 9 September 2011 Liverpool
Vessel Name: DYCKBURG
GT: - 3,660
IMO No: - 9195913
Flag: - Antigua & Barbuda
Company: - Werse Bereederungs Gmbh
Classification Society: - Lloyds Register of Shipping (LR)
Recognised Organisation: - Germanischer Lloyd (GL)
Summary: - 17 deficiencies; 1 ground for detention
The vessel was detained in Liverpool because there were a large number of Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) related deficiencies which were objective evidence of a serious failure or lack of effectiveness of implementation of the ISM code on board the vessel. Other deficiencies identified included: the main engine was defective; also the engine room was very oily in some areas; the five year service on the immersion suit in the engine room had expired; there was no evidence that the freefall lifeboat had been manoeuvred in the water within the last 3 months also there was no evidence that the freefall lifeboat had been freefall launched within the last 6 months; in addition the deck officer was not familiar with launching the starboard life raft by davit.
The vessel was still detained on 29 February 2012

Date and Place of detention: 4 March 2010 – Lowestoft
Vessel Name: - CIEN PORCIENTO (General Cargo)
GT: - 106
IMO No: - 8944446
Flag: - Unregistered
Company: - Open Window Inc
Classification Society: - Unclassed
Recognised Organisation: - Not applicable
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - Not applicable
Summary: - 30 deficiencies; 7 grounds for detention
The vessel was detained in Lowestoft because the main fire pump was inoperative and there was no alternative fire pump outside the machinery space. There were insufficient liferafts, the sanitary water system was inoperative and there was no fresh running water to the galley, pantry and shower room. There were no nautical publications and charts were incomplete for the operational area.
Other deficiencies found were insufficient provisions for the intended voyage and medicines were out of date. In addition the following items were found to be missing: distress flares; line throwing appliances; lifebuoys; life jackets with lights; immersion suits; satellite (Emergency Positioning Indicating Radio Beacon) (EPIRB); fire extinguishers and the fire hose nozzle.
The vessel was still detained at 29 February2012

-Ends-

Notes to Editors
 
Follow us on Twitter. Find us at MCA_media

Sunday, 25 March 2012

SEARCH FOR MAN WHO HAD LOST HIS WAY

Swansea Coastguard received a call at from a man on his mobile phone, he had found himself lost and in need of help. He was able to offer limited information with respect to helping to identify his location except for open water and marshlands.

Coastguard Rescue Officers from Burnham on Sea were sent to carryout a search and the RNLI Weston-Super-Mare inshore lifeboat was requested to launch.

David Jones, Watch Manager, Swansea Coastguard, says:

“With the light fading fast we kept the man talking on the line for 25 minutes, we were able to question him on his location and his surroundings. 

The Coastguard Rescue Officers were able to locate him at approximately ; they were looking down on him from the cliff edge at Brean Down, so they let of a white flare which illuminated the area allowing the lifeboat to locate him by the water.  A member of the lifeboat crew disembarked and walked the man up the cliff to the Coastguard Rescue Officers who were able to ensure the man was safe and well.

The Coastguard would like to remind the public as this man did when you get into difficulty on the coast call ‘999’ and ask for the Coastguard. You can do this even if you have no credit on your phone or if the phone is locked. Tell the Coastguard what the problem is and where you are. You may need to stay on the line to direct them to the scene. 

Always remember to tell someone where you are going and when you expect to return, informing them of any changes.”


Notes to Editors:

  • Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

  • Follow us on Twitter. We can be found at  MCA_media

  • The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities  http://www.seavisionuk.org/

                                                                          

For further details contact:
The Maritime & Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
Office hours: 023 8032 9401
Mobile: 07764 624 505
Press releases and further information about the Agency is available on the Web at www.mcga.gov.uk

MAN BURIED IN SAND IS RESCUED

Humber Coastguard received a call from ambulance control at just after 4.00 pm today to request assistance for the man who was at Druridge Bay near Cresswell. The Newbiggin, Amble and Howick Coastguard Rescue Teams went to the scene and joined police, fire and ambulance personnel. All of the teams worked to dig around the man, stabilise him and put him on oxygen. The fire service then called in their urban search and rescue team who shored up the hole so that the man could finally be recovered.
Bev Allen Humber Coastguard Watch Manager says:
“Visitors to the beach need to bear in mind that sand is extremely unstable. And sand dunes of course, by their nature are constantly shifting. We are very relieved that we managed to recover this man relatively unscathed from the sand. It does not bear thinking about what might have happened had a child been in the hole instead.
“We want our visitors to enjoy our wonderful coastline, particularly in the lovely weather that we are having at the moment. However, if you’re digging holes in the sand, dig them away from areas such as sand dunes where sand could slide, only dig up to the smallest person’s waist and never dig tunnels.”

ABERDEEN COASTGUARD COORDINATE EVACUATION FROM TWO GAS RIGS IN NORTH SEA

An evacuation of non essential personnel is currently taking place 240km off Aberdeen on the Elgin and Rowan Viking platforms.

The evacuation in the central Graben area is due to a well control problem occurring on the wellhead platform at the Elgin field, resulting in a gas release at

Aberdeen Coastguard is coordinating the orderly evacuation of 209 non essential personnel to a place of safety.

Following the incident, all personnel were called to muster and have been accounted for.  No injuries have been reported.

Kevin Brown, Watch Manager, Aberdeen Coastguard, says:

“Emergency procedures have been activated. We are working closely with Total E&P UK Limited. We have three Rescue helicopters on scene and the assistance of four civilian helicopters all aiding with the evacuation process. 

Work is ongoing to control the release.”


Notes to Editors:

·         TOTAL has been present in the United Kingdom since 1962.  TOTAL E&P UK Limited is one of the main oil and gas operators on the UK Continental Shelf. More information is available on www.uk.total.com
 
  • Follow us on Twitter. We can be found at  MCA_media

  • The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities  http://www.seavisionuk.org/

                                                                          

For further details contact:
The Maritime & Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
Office hours: 023 8032 9401
Mobile
: 07764 624 505

Press releases and further information about the Agency is available on the Web at www.mcga.gov.uk

Saturday, 24 March 2012

KAYAKERS THROWN AGAINST ROCKS



A man and a young child were thrown from their kayak as it capsized off of Thurlestone, South Devon.

Brixham Coastguard received a call at from a member of the public on a nearby golf course; he could hear people screaming from the water below.

Coastguard Rescue Officers from Hope Cove were sent to the scene and the Hope Cove Independent Lifeboat was launched as well as scrambling the Coastguard Rescue helicopter from Portland.

Dave Colmer, Brixham Coastguard, says:

“We were very concerned for the welfare of the two occupants of the kayak; we believe one to be in his late fifties and the other to be ten years old.  They were both being washed up against the rocks; a surfer was able to help assist them by getting in close to the rocks in order to evacuate them to the rescue boat.
The paramedics from the Rescue helicopter assessed the two casualties who were suffering from hypothermia; they were taken to Derriford Hospital by helicopter.”
General advice for kayakers:

  • Make sure that you tell someone at home where you are going and when you expect to come back, ensure they know how to raise the alarm (call 999 and ask for the Coastguard) if you do not return when expected.

  • Communications gear such as a handheld VHF radio and mini flares should be kept somewhere within grabbing distance in case you get into difficulty.

  • A mobile phone inside a sealed plastic bag might be a good back up although do not rely upon it since the signal is not great along the coast.

  • If you really want to invest, a personal locator beacon would be very useful for alerting the emergency services if you are in difficulty, whether at the coast or on land.

Notes to Editors:

  • Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch
                                                                                                                     
  • Follow us on Twitter. We can be found at  MCA_media

  • The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities  http://www.seavisionuk.org/

                                                                          

For further details contact:
The Maritime & Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
Office hours: 023 8032 9401
Mobile: 07764 624 505
Press releases and further information about the Agency is available on the Web at www.mcga.gov.uk

COLLISION IN DOVER STRAIT



Two ships on passage in the Dover Strait collided in poor visibility this morning.

The ‘Gas Arctic,’ LPG tanker currently in ballast, registered in Malta was on passage from Tees to Portland, with 14 crew aboard. The ‘Spring Bok’, cargo ship, registered in the Netherlands was on passage from Amsterdam to Oranjestad, Aruba, with 22 crew aboard. The vessels collided this morning when visibility was less than half a mile.

Dover Coastguard requested the launch of the Dungeness all weather lifeboat and requested the assistance of HMS Tyne which was transiting the Strait.

Phil Davies, Watch Officer, Dover Coastguard, says:

“The vessels have both incurred damage above the water line but are fully capable of making their way to Portland where they will be inspected.”


Notes to Editors:

  • Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch
                                                                                                                     
  • Follow us on Twitter. We can be found at  MCA_media

  • The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities  http://www.seavisionuk.org/

                                                                          

For further details contact:
The Maritime & Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
Office hours: 023 8032 9401
Mobile: 07764 624 505
Press releases and further information about the Agency is available on the Web at www.mcga.gov.uk

Friday, 23 March 2012

YOUNG BOY RESCUED FROM CLIFF



An eleven year old boy was rescued after becoming stranded on the cliff at Combe Martin, North Devon this evening.

Swansea Coastguard received a ‘999’ call at from another young boy requesting help for his friend, who had got cut off by the tide. We understand the boy had tried to climb the cliff but had got stuck 3 metres up the cliff.

Coastguard Rescue Teams from Lynmouth and Ifracombe were sent to the scene and the Rescue Helicopter from RAF Chivenor was scrambled and the inshore RNLI lifeboat from Ilfracombe was requested to launch.

David Jones, Watch Manager, Swansea Coastguard, says:

“The Rescue helicopter was able to rescue the young boy and take him to the top of the cliff where he was met by Coastguard Rescue Officers; I am pleased to say he is safe and well.
I understand he was with a group of friends, but became detached from the group whilst looking in a cave at the foot of the cliff, his friend who raised the alarm was able to stay on the phone and assisted us by giving us accurate information which brought about a swift rescue.
Our advice to the public when using Cliff and coastal paths is to make sure that you are properly equipped for walking along coastal paths. In particular remember to wear sturdy shoes or boots and check the weather forecast before you set out. Do not attempt to climb up or down cliffs unless you are properly equipped and trained to do so. Do not attempt to climb cliffs as a short cut back to the top. Do not attempt self rescue. If you get into difficulty, call 999 and ask for the coastguard.”


Notes to Editors:

  • Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch
                                                                                                                     
  • Follow us on Twitter. We can be found at  MCA_media

  • The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities  http://www.seavisionuk.org/

                                                                          

For further details contact:
The Maritime & Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
Office hours: 023 8032 9401
Mobile: 07764 624 505
Press releases and further information about the Agency is available on the Web at www.mcga.gov.uk

Wednesday, 14 March 2012

DIVER RESCUED FROM SHIPPING LANE IN CHANNEL

A diver was rescued from the North East shipping lane of the Dover Strait this afternoon after he was spotted in the water shouting for help.

He was spotted in the middle of the Channel, near the Sandettie South West Buoy, at approximately quarter to four, by a passing ship. They called Dover Coastguard who immediately sent the RAF Rescue helicopter from Wattisham and the RNLI lifeboats from Walmer and Dover to the scene. Dover Coastguard also broadcast a warning to vessels in the area.

Around twenty minutes later Dover Coastguard was told by a dive boat in the area that their diver was missing. Dover lifeboat was sent to the dive boat to find out more information about the missing person.
 
Just as Walmer lifeboat was reaching the scene the merchant vessel ‘Edenborg’, who had heard the alert and was keeping a look out told Dover Coastguard that they could see a person in the water in front of their ship. The ‘Edenborg’ slowed down to help the person and was able to guide Walmer lifeboat. The lifeboat then rescued the diver from the shipping lane.

The dive boat confirmed that this was their missing diver and they were reunited before returning to Dover Harbour safe and well, escorted by Dover lifeboat.

Dover Coastguard Watch Manager Sarah Bray said:

“We’re not sure how the diver came to be adrift in the shipping lane but he was lucky to be spotted by such a large vessel and rescued so quickly.

“The diver was diving solo and wearing the correct equipment for this time of year but we were unaware that a dive was taking place in our area. Divers are advised to make the Coastguard aware of their plans at the start of a dive operation for their own safety.”

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Monday, 12 March 2012

ANGLING BOAT LOST IN FOG IN SWANSEA BAY

An angling boat had to be rescued this afternoon after it got lost in fog in Swansea Bay.

The 22-foot angling boat was on its way home from a fishing trip when the fog thickened and they became disorientated. They contacted Swansea Coastguard to report that the GPS on board wasn’t working and as the tide was going out and they couldn’t see where they were they had decided to drop anchor and wait for the fog to lift.

Swansea Coastguard sent Mumbles RNLI Lifeboat to search the water and Mumbles Coastguard Rescue Team to their reported position to see if they could hear the boat. After an hour and a half of searching the lifeboat found the angling vessel and brought it safely back to Swansea Marina.

Swansea Coastguard Watch Manager Steven Matthews said:

“Spring fog is a well known phenomenon and our misty morning quickly became thick fog.

“These conditions are forecast to be around for the next couple of days and so this incident is a timely reminder for all mariners that navigating by what you can see is a very risky strategy.

“The MCA recommends that all inshore boats should be fitted with VHF DSC radio equipment which can send a distress alert and, if it is linked up to a GPS, an accurate position of your vessel to the Coastguard with one touch of a button. You should also carry flares.”
 
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Saturday, 10 March 2012

FISHERMAN PLUCKED FROM LIFERAFT AFTER BOAT SINKS

A Plymouth fisherman was rescued from his liferaft by lifeboat after his nine-metre fishing vessel, ‘Arandora  Star’, started taking water and sank whilst in Bigbury Bay.
Brixham Coastguard received a 999 call from a member of the public reporting that they had seen a parachute flare over the bay and that he could see the vessel in difficulty. The coastguard requested the launch of Plymouth RNLI lifeboat and scrambled a rescue helicopter. The pleasure vessel ‘Itinerant Child’ also saw the flare and went to the aid of the fisherman. The dive vessel ‘outcast’ responded to a mayday relay message and also went to the scene.
Once the lifeboat arrived on scene it was able to rescue the man from his liferaft and take him to shore. He was unharmed although shocked by his ordeal.
Matt Thornhill, Brixham Coastguard Watch Officer says:
 “The fisherman’s vessel sank very quickly, but he was already sensibly wearing a lifejacket and immersion suit, so was able to get into his liferaft and await rescue. He had tried to use his vhf radio to call for help, but unfortunately the batteries were wet so he fired flares to attract attention. ”

ANGLERS LOST IN FOG GUIDED TO SAFETY

Two anglers, who became disorientated in fog on a rising tide, were helped to safety last night by the Llantwit Major Coastguard Rescue Team and two lifeboats.
Swansea Coastguard received a call from the anglers at 5.00 am this morning, requesting assistance because they had become disorientated as fog descended at Monknash Beach near Llantwit Major. The two men, in their early twenties and from Swansea, had arrived at about 10.00 pm for a night’s fishing.
Swansea Coastguard sent the Llantwit Major Coastguard Rescue Team to the beach and requested the Atlantic College and Porthcawl Inshore RNLI lifeboats to launch. The men had head torches with them and the lifeboat crew managed to see them through the fog. Swansea Coastguard connected the coastguard to the two men through a conference call and they were able to confirm their location near Whitmore Stairs. The coastguard rescue team located the two men and guided them off the beach and back to the car park.
Bernie Kemble, Swansea Coastguard Watch Manager says:
“Before you set out on angling trip, make sure that you prepare well so that you can have a safe and enjoyable time:
·         Check the tide times – this information is widely available on the web. Be particularly aware of spring tides (we are experiencing them at the moment). A ‘spring tide’ means that high water is higher than usual.
·         Check the weather forecast. Be aware of the potential for fog even following pleasant clear weather.
·         Wear reflective clothing and take a good torch with you.
·         Make sure that you take a means of contact with you (be aware that mobile phone coverage is patchy under cliffs etc).
·         Consider whether you need to wear a lifejacket – for example if you are fishing from rocks near the sea at night.

Saturday, 3 March 2012

ENGINE FIRE ON FORTH PILOT BOAT

The ‘Forth Leopard’, a Forth Pilot Boat, reported an engine room fire to Forth Coastguard at 3.30am today.

The two crew reported that there was a fire in the engine room and that they were in the middle of the Firth of Forth. They had used the onboard fire control system to seal the engine room and believed the fire was under control. There were no reported injuries.

Forth Coastguard sent the RNLI lifeboat from Kinghorn and the Forth Ports’ tug ‘Fidra’ to the scene. ‘Fidra’ towed ‘Forth Leopard’ to Leith Docks where it was met by Lothian and Borders Fire Service who investigated the fire. Fisherrow Coastguard Rescue Team was also at the docks to monitor the situation.

Gordon Downard Watch Manager Forth Coastguard said:

“Fire on a vessel at sea is every mariners’ nightmare but this was a textbook example of how it should be dealt with.”

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