Wednesday, 31 October 2012

TEN FOREIGN FLAGGED SHIPS UNDER DETENTION IN THE UK DURING SEPTEMBER 2012

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) has announced that ten foreign flagged ships were under detention in UK ports during September 2012 after failing Port State Control (PSC) inspection.

Latest monthly figures show that there were six new detentions of foreign flagged ships in UK ports during September 2012 and four vessels remained under detention from previous months. The overall rate of detentions compared with inspections carried out over the last twelve months was 3.37% this is slightly up from  August’s twelve month rate.

Out of the detained vessels seven were registered with a flag state listed on the Paris MOU white list, two were registered with a flag state on the grey list, none were registered with a flag state on the black list, one was unregistered and none were registered with a flag state that was not included on the Paris MOU white, grey or black lists.

1. In response to one of the recommendations of Lord Donaldson's Inquiry into the prevention of pollution from merchant shipping and in compliance with the EU Directive on Port State Control (2009/16/EC as amended), the Maritime and Coastguard agency (MCA) publishes full details of the foreign flagged vessels detained in UK ports each month.

2. Inspections of foreign flagged ships in UK ports are undertaken by surveyors from the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. Where a ship is found to be deficient or lacks the required documentation, Maritime and Coastguard Agency surveyors can take a range of actions leading to detention in serious cases. The UK is part of a regional agreement on port state control known as the Paris Memorandum of Understanding on Port State Control (Paris MOU) and information on all ships that are inspected is held centrally in an electronic database known as Thetis. This allows the ships of flags with poor detention records to be targeted for future inspection.

3. Detained ships have to satisfy surveyors that remedial work has been carried out before they are allowed to leave port.

4. When applicable the list includes those passenger craft prevented from operating under the provisions of the EU Directive on Mandatory Surveys for the safe operation of regular Ro-Ro ferry and high speed passenger craft services (1999/35/EU).

Notes on the list of detentions
Full details of the ship.
The accompanying detention list shows ship’s name, the flag state and the ship’s International Maritime Organization (IMO) number which is unchanging throughout the ship’s life and uniquely identifies it.
Company.
The company shown in the vessel’s Safety Management Certificate or the party otherwise believed to be responsible for the safety of the ship at the time of inspection.
Classification Society.
The list shows the Classification Society responsible for classing the ship and not necessarily the party issuing and/or carrying out surveys for certificates relevant to the defect found.
Recognised Organisation.
The “organisation” - responsible for conducting the statutory surveys: and issuing statutory certificates, (on behalf of the Flag State).
Defects.
The list gives a summary of the main grounds for detention and includes information where the ship has been released to sail to another port for repairs.



SHIPS DETAINED IN SEPTEMBER 2012

Date and Place of detention: - 01 September 2012 Belfast
Vessel name: - ANGELA (Multi Purpose)
GT: - 3,804
Imo No: - 9071076
Flag: - Belize                                                                    
Company: - ARG Shipping SIA
Classification Society: - Isthmus Bureau of Shipping Classification Div (IBS)
Recognised Organisation:-Isthmus Bureau of Shipping Classification Div (IBS)
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - Isthmus Bureau of Shipping Classification Div (IBS)
Summary: - Nineteen deficiencies including five grounds for detention

The vessel was detained in Belfast because there was a lack of familiarity by crew with emergency preparedness and several fire doors were not closing. The man overboard markers had expired and; tthe sludge tank sounding pipe was  held open. 
Deficiencies marked as ISM were objective evidence of a serious failure, or lack of effectiveness of the implementation of the ISM Code.

A number of fire protection related deficiencies were found including the fire main isolating valve was not marked, some fire doors were tied open and the fireman’s lamp in the forward fire station was not working. Other deficiencies identified included: the  life raft Hydrostatic Release Units (HRU) were incorrectly connected and were not marked with an expiry date; some of the hatch seals were not watertight; the SOLAS training manual was neither complete nor ship specific;, the original of the continuous synopsis record was not on board;, and there was no navigational chart for the port of  arrival. The compass correction log had incomplete entries and records. There was no security watch at the gangway and the identity of the ‘PSCO’ was not checked. The general crew alarm was not functioning, the mooring ropes were left on the barrel ends and the hot water supply had insufficient pressure.

The vessel was released on the 07 September 2012.


Date and Place of detention: - 19 September 2012 Southampton
Vessel name: - MAPLE INGRID(General Cargo)
GT: - 9,585
Imo No: - 9339923
Flag: - Antigua & Barbuda                                           
Company: - Greenstar Steamship Company GMBH & Co KG
Classification Society: - Nippon Kaiji Kyokai (NKK)
Recognised Organisation: - Nippon Kaiji Kyokai (NKK) and Germanischer Lloyd (GL)
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - Germanischer Lloyd (GL)
Summary: - Twenty-nine deficiencies including one grounds for detention

The vessel was detained in Southampton as deficiencies marked as ISM were objective evidence of a serious failure, or lack of effectiveness of the implementation of the ISM Code.

Other deficiencies identified were the retention of oil on board, unable to operate the Oily Water Separator and the oil record book was incomplete. The records of hours of work/rest for senior officers were not as required. The master could not find flag state endorsements or whether valid certificates were held. There were expired certification for rating for watch-keeping, emergency escape breathing device inspection and the fire fighting equipment & appliances certificate. There was a lack of familiarity for the use of life saving appliances and the operation of fire protection systems and several pieces of fire fighting equipment was not as required.

The vessel had hatch covers missing and the safe access to vessel was insecure and not in position. There was a lack of cleanliness in the Cold room and the temperature was not low enough and contained hardly any fruit or vegetables and no milk found. There was a lack of security as both fresh water filling pipes were unlocked. In working spaces there was insufficient ventilation and inoperative lighting, the magnetic compass had an air bubble in compass bowl and there was no spare compass on board.

The vessel was released on the 21 September 2012.


Date and Place of detention: - 24 September 2012 Hartlepool
Vessel name: - STEVNS OCEAN(Off-Shore)
GT: - 512
Imo No: - 9224960
Flag: - Denmark                                                              
Company: - Nordane Shipping A/S Denmark
Classification Society: - Bureau Veritas (BV)
Recognised Organisation: - Bureau Veritas (BV)
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - Bureau Veritas (BV)
Summary: - Seventeen deficiencies including two grounds for detention

The vessel was detained in Hartlepool because the fire detection and alarm system were inoperable and the deficiencies marked as ISM were objective evidence of a serious failure, or lack of effectiveness of the implementation of the ISM Code.

Other deficiencies found were: not all crew members were having sufficient rest hours, the starboard Man Over Board light was  inoperative and the echo sounder was inoperative. Records in the magnetic compass error log and the sewage discharge book were not complete. When the vessel was revisited to be released, there was no safe means of access rigged from shore to ship and no security in place to meet the PSCO a there was a lack of training evident during the fire and abandon ship drill.

The vessel was still detained at 30 September 2012.

Date and Place of detention: - 25 September 2012 Cardiff
Vessel name: - ULUSOY- 8 (Bulk Carrier)
GT: - 14852
Imo No: - 9458250
Flag: - Turkey                                                                  
Company: - Ulusoy Deniz Yollari Isletmeciligi AS
Classification Society: - Bureau VERITAS (BV)
Recognised Organisation: - Bureau VERITAS (BV) and Lloyd ’s Register (LR)
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - Bureau VERITAS (BV)
Summary: - Twenty-one deficiencies including four grounds for detention

The vessel was detained in Cardiff as the starting of the main engine was unsatisfactory. Crew were not familiar with the safe procedure for the launch and recovery of the lifeboat. Oily bilge water was found at the after end on the tank top.. Deficiencies marked as ISM were objective evidence of a serious failure, or lack of effectiveness of the implementation of the ISM Code.

Other deficiencies identified included: The main engine bridge control was not operational; steering gear alarm not working. The gangway ladder was rigged in dangerous manner and there was an unsatisfactory repair to handle rail; the oil record book was incomplete; a mooring line was found with one section spliced with different diameter rope. Some fire doors were not shutting properly. A fire hose had to be replaced and the main fire line relief valve was leaking. Temporary fresh water supply fitted to galley and there was no hot water supply either. The accommodation and food store was found to have an infestation of cockroaches and the meatroom temperature was too high. There was a lack of personal protection of crew as only one set of Self Contained Breathi ng Apparatus for dangerous goods but two were listed in the documentation.

The vessel was still detained at 30 September 2012.

Date and Place of detention: - 27 September 2012 Silvertown, River Thames
Vessel name: - NIN (Bulk Carrier)
GT: - 17928
Imo No: - 9211547
Flag: - Malta                                                                      
Company: - Tankerska Providsa
Classification Society: - Bureau Veritas (BV)
Recognised Organisation: - Bureau Veritas (BV)
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - Bureau Veritas (BV)
Summary: - Eleven deficiencies including four grounds for detention

The vessel was detained at Silvertown on the River Thames as there was a lack of control and communication during the fire drills as the wrong location of the fire was reported and no BA drill carried out. There were sounding caps missing on deck to  double bottom tanks and bilges. All the deficiencies were marked as ISM and were objective evidence of a serious failure, or lack of effectiveness of the implementation of the ISM Code.

Other deficiencies found included that the Chief Officer did not comply with the risk assessment/work permit resulting in the Chief Officer (C/O) falling into the river. The oxygen meter did not show 20.9% of oxygen as required. Some of the sight glasses were gagged, the light was not working at the pilot boarding point. Some charts and nautical publications had expired. The air trunking was holed in the fire control locker.

The vessel was still detained at 30 September 2012.

Date and Place of detention: - 28 September 2012 Southampton
Vessel name: - RIVER KING (General Cargo )
GT: - 794
Imo No: - 8324581
Flag: - Belize                                                                    
Company: - Marco Polo Maritime Ltd
Classification Society: - International Naval Surveys Bureau (INBS)
Recognised Organisation: - International Naval Surveys Bureau (INBS)
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - International Naval Surveys Bureau (INBS)
Summary: - Eleven deficiencies including three grounds for detention

The vessel was detained in Southampton as there was no evidence of an internal audit within three months as required for Safety Management Certificate interim certification., The emergency fire pump was unable to produce sufficient pressure and the deficiencies marked as ISM were objective evidence of a serious failure, or lack of effectiveness of the implementation of the ISM Code.
Other deficiencies found were the muster list was not as required for abandon ship procedure; there was a lack of training to operate MF radio Installation. The crew were not sufficiently familiar with operation of CO2 system and the system directional valve was very stiff. There was no authorisation for the carriage of grain held by vessel, even though records show grain carried in last month. There was no evidence of use of NAVTEX since 02 September 2012, and passage planning was not being completed. The hours of rest records for crew were not as required for September 2012.

The vessel was still detained at 30 September 2012.


DETENTIONS CARRIED OVER FROM PREVIOUS MONTHS

Date and Place of detention: - 19 June 2012 Portland
Vessel name: - TERRY SIETE (General Cargo Ship)
GT: - 3,120
Imo No: - 8405933
Flag: - Panama
Company: - PM Shipping International SA
Classification Society: - International Maritime Bureau
Recognised Organisation: - Panama Maritime Documentation Services Inc (PMDS)
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - Panama Maritime Documentation Services Inc (PMDS)
Summary: - forty deficiencies including twelve grounds for detention

The vessel was detained in Portland because the fire damper was seized and the MF/HF Radio Installation was inoperative. Significant findings related to the structure and watertight integrity including: significantly corroded and holed bulkhead between the cargo hold and ballast tank; two areas where corrosion had holed accommodation bulkheads; corroded and ineffective closing devices on hold vents and missing focs’le hatch cover securing arrangements. Also corroded and holed access trunking, cargo hold cable gooseneck and focs’le hatch cover. Deficiencies marked as ISM were objective evidence of a serious failure, or lack of effectiveness of the implementation of the ISM Code.

The inspection was suspended and the vessel detained with the requirement that the Master request the attendance of the Flag State or Registered Organisation to oversee repairs and confirm rectification of the noted deficiencies and also carry out additional surveys.

The vessel was released on the 07 September 2012.


Date and Place of detention: - 9 September 2011 Liverpool
Vessel Name: - DYCKBURG
GT: - 3,660
IMO No: - 9195913                                                          
Flag: - Antigua & Barbuda
Company: - Werse Bereederungs Gmbh
Classification Society: -  Lloyds Register of Shipping (LR)
Recognised Organisation: - Germanischer Lloyd (GL)
Summary: - seventeen deficiencies including one ground for detention

The vessel was detained in Liverpool because there were a large number of Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) related deficiencies which were objective evidence of a serious failure or lack of effectiveness of implementation of the ISM code on board the vessel. Other deficiencies identified included: the main engine was defective; also the engine room was very oily in some areas; the five year service on the immersion suit in the engine room had expired; there was no evidence that the freefall lifeboat had been manoeuvred in the water within the last 3 months also there was no evidence that the freefall lifeboat had been freefall launched within the last 6 months; in addition the deck officer was not familiar with launching the starboard life raft by davit.

The vessel was still detained at 30 September 2012.


Date and Place of detention: - 8 November 2010 Birkenhead
Vessel Name: - MOST SKY (General Cargo)
GT: - 1,972
IMO No: - 9389370                                                          
Flag: - Panama
Company: - ER Em Denizcilik
Classification Society: - Russian Maritime Register of Shipping (RMRS)
Summary: - twelve deficiencies including four grounds for detention

The vessel was detained in Birkenhead because the engine room was very dirty, there were fuel oil leaks and a major non conformity was identified with respect to the lack of maintenance of the ship and equipment. Other deficiencies identified included: the crew/officers records of rest were not signed; the crew accommodation was no longer provided with steam heating; the galley needed cleaning; there was insufficient fruit and vegetables on board; the crew showers and toilets were dirty and the shower curtains missing and the laundry washing facilities were inadequate. In addition the lifejacket lights were out of date; the aft deck was slippery underneath the deck generator and several fire doors were tied open.

The vessel was still detained at 30 September 2012.


Date and Place of detention: 4 March 2010 – Lowestoft
Vessel Name: - CIEN PORCIENTO (General Cargo)
GT: - 106
IMO No: - 8944446                                                          
Flag: - Unregistered
Company: - Open Window Inc
Classification Society: - Unclassed
Recognised Organisation: - Not applicable
Recognised Organisation for ISM: - Not applicable
Summary: - thirty deficiencies including seven grounds for detention

The vessel was detained in Lowestoft because the main fire pump was inoperative and there was no alternative fire pump outside the machinery space. There were insufficient liferafts, the sanitary water system was inoperative and there was no fresh running water to the galley, pantry and shower room. There were no nautical publications and charts were incomplete for the operational area.

Other deficiencies found were insufficient provisions for the intended voyage and medicines were out of date. In addition the following items were found to be missing:
distress flares; line throwing appliances; lifebuoys; life jackets with lights; immersion suits; satellite (Emergency Positioning Indicating Radio Beacon) (EPIRB); fire extinguishers and the fire hose nozzle.

The vessel was still detained at 30 September 2012.

SUPPORTING SHIPPING: WHAT WE CAN DO FOR YOU


The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) has been outlining its support for the shipping industry, which is estimated to be worth £5 billion to the UK economy.
 
Sir Alan Massey, Chief Executive of the MCA, has been setting out how the Agency is striving to become the best maritime safety organisation in the world, and in turn offering as much support as possible to the industry.
 
In a speech last night to Maritime London, including industry leaders, lawyers, ship owners and operators, Sir Alan said: "We know that the shipping industry looks for a level playing field to compete fairly in a tough economic climate. You are right to demand high regulatory standards, applied consistently by our Marine Surveyors and Port State Control Officers.”
 
The MCA is now actively working to improve its processes, reduce red tape and make things quicker and less complicated.
 
During the speech, Sir Alan also made it clear that the MCA will take action if needed: "There will be of course be times when shipping companies or seafarers fall short of standards of behaviour that we all demand in the interests of safety and protecting the marine environment."
 
"We owe it to the good operators and the safety-conscious seafarer to take firm action against those who are letting the industry down.”
 
Through collaborative working and mutual support, the MCA aims to help the maritime sector in the UK, and ensure it can be a key engine for economic growth.
 
Sir Alan concluded the speech with a rallying message to all involved with the shipping industry: "We are on your side. Please be on ours!”

Tuesday, 30 October 2012

MASTER OF SHIP FINED AFTER COLLISION IN DOVER STRAITS

At a hearing today at Southampton Magistrates Court, the Master of a cargo vessel pleaded guilty to three offences brought under the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 1974, as amended (Colregs), and fined £1500 plus costs of £1000.

The Spring Bok is 12,113 gross ton Refrigerated Cargo Ship (Reefer) registered in the Netherlands. On the 24 March 2012 she was on passage from Rotterdam to Aruba and was traveling in the South West lane of the Dover Straits Traffic Separation Scheme. A small liquid gas carrier was also heading south west and traveling at 7-8 knots while the Spring Bok was transiting at 18-20 knots.  At approximately 1014 utc, the Spring Bok ran into the stern of the Gas Carrier.  An investigation into the collision was started.

Captain Robert Koningstein was the Officer of the Watch of the Spring Bok. The visibility in the Dover Straits had been poor but had improved to about 2.5 miles off Dungeness. After the visibility had increased he had sent the lookout down. His son and brother-in-law were on the bridge also but not in any official capacity. Captain Koningstein admitted that he had seen the Gas Artic some 20 minutes before the collision. However he had no recollection of seeing it again until it appeared from behind the forward cranes moments before the collision. Damage on both vessels was comparatively light.

A more serious collision was avoided by the actions of the Master of the Gas carrier who saw the approaching Spring Bok and altered course immediately in order to avoid the collision.

Robert Koningstein pleaded guilty to three charges brought under the Merchant Shipping (Distress Signals and Prevention of Collision) Regulations 1996.  These were a failure to keep a good lookout, a failure to ascertain that risk of collision existed and a failure to keep clear of a vessel being overtaken.

Captain Eric Meare, Marine Surveyor at the Dover Marine Office said:

"The Dover Straits are the busiest shipping lanes in the world. It is essential to maintain a good lookout and watch at all time. Strict compliance with all of the Colregs is essential to ensuring the safety of all users of the Straits.”

COASTGUARD RESCUE OFFICERS ARE ‘PRIDE OF BRITAIN’

The Hartlepool Coastguard Rescue Team and Her Majesty's Coastguard as a whole is celebrating, after receiving a Pride of Britain award.

Coastguard Rescue Officers Colin Lodge and Chris Hornsey, alongside members of the RNLI, received the Daybreak Emergency Services Award last night. It’s for their efforts on 30 September 2011, when Humber Coastguard coordinated a rescue mission to save 17-year-old Neil Robson, who’d become stuck in the sand off Seaton Carew.

The Hartlepool Coastguard Rescue Team, led by Officer in Charge (OIC), Billy Spurs, was first to arrive on scene following a 999 call. Chris and Colin made their way into the water and were quickly joined by the lifeboat crew. It became apparent that scraping and digging the sand under the weight of the water was impossible and the OIC requested the assistance of the Fire and Rescue Service which supplied a high power hose to blast the sand. Neil was freed with his head just above the water and the tide still rising.

Chris said: "I am honoured to have picked up this award on behalf of the whole team who all wanted to take the actions I took to get Neil out of the water as safely and as quickly as possible. This rescue was an excellent example of teams working together.”

Colin said: "This was a real team effort, so I am proud to receive this award on behalf of all the rescue teams involved in saving Neil’s life.”

The award ceremony was held at the Grosvenor House Hotel last night where guests included HRH the Prince of Wales, Prime Minister David Cameron, Sir Michael Caine and Stephen Fry.

The award was presented by members of the Downton Abbey cast, including Elizabeth McGovern and Hugh Bonneville.

The Pride of Britain Awards is being shown on ITV1 tonight, 30 October, at 8pm.

Saturday, 27 October 2012

SEARCH FOR MISSING SKIPPER COORDINATED BY SOLENT COASTGUARD



Solent Coastguard has been coordinating the search for a man this evening, after his yacht was found ashore near Brighstone, Isle of Wight.

A member of the public reported that the yacht ‘Brigand’ was ashore with one of its sails up and the engine still running at 5.15 pm this evening. The yacht had no-one aboard.

An air, land and sea search involving the two Coastguard helicopters from Portland and Lee on Solent, Yarmouth and Mudeford RNLI lifeboats, Freshwater SSRO inshore and all weather lifeboats and Lymington, Needles, Southbourne and Swanage Coastguard Rescue Teams began shortly after the yacht was found. Broadcasts were also made by Solent Coastguard to all passing vessels to keep a sharp look out for any objects in the water.

Solent Coastguard Watch Manager David Williams says:
“We have searched for nearly five hours this evening for the one person who we believe to have been skippering the yacht, but sadly, no sign has been found of him. We understand that he left Poole this morning with the intention of sailing to Hayling Island. All rescue resources have now finished searching for this evening.

“If you are about to set to sea, please ensure that you are familiar with your boat and equipment, get appropriate training and ensure that you and your crew wear well maintained, correctly fitted lifejackets.”

Thursday, 25 October 2012

UNSAFE VESSEL LANDS OWNER IN COURT

At a hearing yesterday at Torquay Magistrates Court, the owner of a former fishing vessel was found guilty of two offences under the Merchant Shipping Act 1995.
Perry Britton was convicted of charge brought under s284 of the Merchant Shipping Act 1995 for allowing the Greitje to ‘jump detention’.  He was also found guilty of one charge brought under s260 of the Merchant Shipping Act 1995 for failing to respond to a Direction Order.  He was fined £500 plus costs of £250.
The former fishing vessel Grietje had arrived in Brixham Harbour in 2005 but plans to convert her into a houseboat came to nought.  Her condition deteriorated and the Greitje was detained as dangerously unsafe by the MCA (Maritime and Coastguard Agency).  Over the following years new owners came and went but nothing was done to rectify the poor condition of the Greitje.  Eventually the vessel was seized by the local harbour authorities and offered for sale.  The vessel was bought for £1 by 56-year-old Perry Britton of Somerset Road East, Barry in May 2010.  He was advised by the MCA that the Greitje was detained and should not sail for Brixham without clearance.  Over the ensuing months, many reminders about the detention were given by the MCA.  The Agency also attempted to engage with Mr Britton about any plans to repair the vessel.  Despite all the warnings, etc, on the 2nd June 2011 the Greitje disappeared from its berth in Brixham. As a result of concerns about the condition of the vessel and its fitness to be at sea, a search operation to locate the Greitje was commenced by the Coastguard. It was eventually located off Cornwall heading west.  It eventually arrived in Cardiff on the 7th June 2011 where it was re-detained by the MCA.  As a result an investigation into the voyage of Greitje was started.  Mr Britton failed to respond to any attempt by the MCA to contact him for his version of events surrounding the voyage between Brixham and Cardiff.
Subsequently Mr Britton was served with a Direction Order issued in accordance with the Merchant Shipping Act 1995 requiring him to produce any documentation relating to any alleged sale of the vessel.  However he failed to respond.
When announcing their decision, the Chairman of the Bench stated that the evidence of Mr. Britton was unconvincing and not credible. Mr. Britton was fined £500 plus £250 costs after taking into account his current financial situation.
Mr Carl Graddage, Area Operations Manager (Survey & Inspection) for Bristol Channel area said: “HM Coastguard took actions to locate the vessel which had left Brixham heading for Wales, as there was concern for the safety of those onboard due to the condition of the vessel. 
“Vessels are detained by the MCA as a last resort, when it would be dangerous to allow them to go to sea.  By allowing the Greitje to sail Mr Britton placed the lives of those onboard at great risk.”

Tuesday, 23 October 2012

TWO RESCUED AFTER FISHING VESSEL SINKS OFF COUNTY DOWN COAST


Two fishermen have been rescued after the fishing vessel Snowdonia sank approximately 12 miles east of Kilkeel Harbour on the County Down coast.

Belfast Coastguard received a call from the fishing vessel Tribute reporting that they had recovered two fishermen from the water. The RNLI lifeboat from Kilkeel and the Irish Coast Guard Search and Rescue helicopter were sent to the scene. The crew of Kilkeel Inshore Lifeboat were quickly on scene and provided first aid until the arrival of the Irish Helicopter.

The two crew were airlifted to Daisy Hill Hospital, Newry where they are currently being assessed.

Gary Young, Watch Manager Belfast Coastguard, said: “This incident has again proved the importance of wearing a lifejacket and having it maintained to a high standard. 

"I would like to pass on my thanks to the professionalism of the lifeboat and helicopter crews."

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency recommends that commercial fisherman should wear a personal floatation device or lifeline whilst working on the deck of a vessel at sea.

Monday, 22 October 2012

MAJOR SEARCH AND RESCUE AFTER HELICOPTER DITCHES OFF SHETLAND

Shetland Coastguard has been coordinating a major search and rescue operation after a helicopter ditched off the coast 15 miles west of Fair Isle this afternoon.

There were 19 people on board, all of which have now been accounted for.

Three RNLI lifeboats (Kirkwall, Aith and Lerwick) went to the scene, along with the Coastguard Search and Rescue Helicopter from Stornoway, RAF Lossiemouth, and the Bond rescue helicopter from Sumburgh. A vessel in the area at the time - the Nord Nightingale - launched its fast rescue craft. This rescued the 19 people from their liferaft and brought them back to the tanker. From here they were flown by the RAF helicopter and Bond helicopter back to Kirkwall.

It’s believed the helicopter was on its way from Aberdeen to West Phoenix drilling rig.

Friday, 19 October 2012

TWO COASTGUARD RESCUE OFFICERS WIN PRIDE OF BRITAIN AWARD

Colin Lodge and Chris Hornsey, along with members of the RNLI, have today been announced as the winners for the Daybreak Emergency Services Award, part of the Daily Mirror’s Pride of Britain Awards.

It’s for their heroics on 30 September 2011, when Humber Coastguard co-ordinated a rescue mission to save 17-year-old Neil Robson, who’d become stuck in the sand off Seaton Carew. But the rescuers were facing a race against time, as the tide was coming in fast.

The Hartlepool Coastguard Rescue Team, led by Officer in Charge, Billy Spurs, was first to arrive on scene following a 999 call. Chris and Colin made their way into the water and were quickly joined by the lifeboat crew. It became apparent that scraping and digging the sand under the weight of the water was impossible and the OIC requested the assistance of the Fire and Rescue Service which supplied a high power hose to blast the sand. Neil was freed with his head just above the water and the tide still rising.

Chris said: “I am so honoured to have won the Pride of Britain award, a nomination that I have gained as a member of a team that all wanted to take the actions I took. Our aim was to get Neil out of the water as safely and efficiently as possible. This we managed to do with the help of all of the other agencies working together as a team.”

Greg Albrighton, Coastguard manager for the area, said: “I am so pleased that we’ve received national recognition through this Pride of Britain award, not only for Colin and Chris, but for the Hartlepool Coastguard Rescue Team and HM Coastguard as a whole. This rescue really was an excellent example of teams working together.”

The rescuers will now be invited to attend the awards ceremony on 29 October. The event will be shown on ITV1 on Tuesday 30 October.