Friday, 31 August 2012

BEACON LOST FROM YACHT CAUSES INTERNATIONAL RESCUE

A beacon lost overboard from a 42 ft yacht today created a search involving coastguards from the UK, Netherlands and Germany.

At just before 8am Falmouth Coastguard received an alert from an emergency position-indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) that was registered to a German owned 42-foot yacht.

Because of the position of the beacon Yarmouth Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre took over control of the search for the yacht. They sent the RAF Rescue helicopter from Wattisham to the scene along with the RNLI Lifeboat based at Aldeburgh, meanwhile the German authorities tried to contact the owner.

At just before 12.30pm the yacht was spotted by the RAF Rescue helicopter from Wattisham. The crew confirmed that the EPIRB had been lost overboard sometime earlier.

Yarmouth Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre Watch Manager Peter Wheeler said:
"Distress radio beacons like EPIRBs are tracking transmitters which are designed to alert rescue authorities when a vessel needs assistance. It’s therefore really important that if you lose your distress beacon you tell the authorities immediately to prevent a full-scale search and operation being launched."

-Ends-

Wednesday, 29 August 2012

UK AND FRENCH COASTGUARDS HELP YACHT OFF NEEDLES

Two French crew on their yacht have been escorted safely into Cowes after broadcasting a Mayday when one crew member fell overboard, off the Needles. 
Solent Coastguard received the Mayday broadcast from the sailing yacht Bridailly at 3:34pm, the broadcast was in French. Solent Coastguard scrambled the coastguard rescue helicopter from and requested the launch of the Yarmouth RNLI lifeboat.  The vessel and crew were located in the Hurst Narrows (Needles) and escorted into Cowes.   
Steven Mann at Solent Coastguard said: 
“We needed to ask the caller questions so we called on our counterparts in France at MRCC Joburg to help with the language barrier. We connected our radios to the French phone system to enable our colleagues to communicate directly with the casualty vessel using the needles channel 16 aerial.  We found out that there were two people aboard the 10.6 metre Jeanneau sailing yacht, one of which had fallen in the water with his lifejacket on and was fortunately connected to a lifeline, he had been recovered to the boat but had hit his head. 
The crew on board the yacht were wearing the appropriate safety equipment and raised the alarm by broadcasting a Mayday, coupled with the assistance given by the French Coastguard it all helped to bring about a quick and successful conclusion to this incident. 
I am pleased to say that no medical assistance was required.” 


Notes to Editors:

MRCC – Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre

  • Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch
                                                                                                                     
  • Follow us on Twitter. We can be found at  MCA_media

  • The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities  www.seavisionuk.org

                                                                          

Tuesday, 28 August 2012

GIRL IN KAYAK SWEPT OUT AT DERBYHAVEN


A 7-year-old girl was rescued from the bay at Derbyhaven this afternoon after being swept offshore by southwesterly winds. 

The Marine Operations Centre based at the Isle of Man contacted Liverpool Coastguard at 1.26 pm to let them know that they been alerted to a young child being blown offshore in a sea kayak.  The mother of the child had swam approximately 100 metres out to try and rescue the girl but was not able to reach her and was forced to turn back. 

Liverpool Coastguard requested the launch of the Ronaldsway Airport Inshore Rescue Boat and the Port St Mary RNLI lifeboat, along with sending the Castletown Coastguard Rescue Team.  Concerned that the child might get swept out of the bay, Liverpool Coastguard also contacted the HSC Manannan Ferry and asked them to keep a visual of the child at a safe distance to ensure she was not swept out further.

Two other sea kayakers on scene attempted to rescue the child but all three ended up on the rocks.  The Ronaldsway Airport Inshore Rescue Boat then brought the girl and her kayak back to shore.

Volunteers in the Castletown coastguard team spoke to the parents of the girl and gave some safety advice about the dangers of offshore winds.

Paul Parkes, Liverpool Coastguard Watch Manager said:

“When undertaking any leisure activities on the water with young children we would always recommend that they are accompanied by a capable adult.  As this incident shows, offshore winds can be extremely hazardous to children in inflatables or any craft where they are not able to make it back to shore unaided.”

COUPLE IN CAR RESCUED FROM HOLY ISLAND CAUSEWAY

A couple have been rescued by helicopter from their car on Holy Island causeway after becoming cut off by the tide.

Humber Coastguard received the call at 12.30 this afternoon after the couple initially dialed 999 and asked for the Police but were transferred to the Coastguard.  The couple were extremely concerned as the tide was rising and the water was level with the seats in their car.

Humber Coastguard sent the Holy Island and Seahouses Coastguard Rescue Teams to the scene and requested a rescue helicopter from RAF Boulmer.  The helicopter arrived on scene at 13.00 and winched the couple, who were then assessed by ambulance paramedics and deemed to be shocked and wet but otherwise unharmed.

Humber Coastguard Watch Manager Fran Wilkins said:

"We deal with incidents on a fairly regular basis where people cross the causeway either by foot or by car and become cut off by the tide.  We would ask members of the public to pay close attendance to the signage either side of the causeway that advises of the times the causeway is safe to cross.  In this case the causeway closed at 11.10 and the couple called us at 12.30 to raise the alarm.”
 

Monday, 27 August 2012

LOCH GAIRLOCH SEARCH FOR MISSING MAN SUSPENDED

After another day of extensive land, sea and air searches in the Loch Gairloch area for a 32 year old man missing after the capsizing of a canoe yesterday, the search operation has now been suspended.

Portree and Lochinver RNLI lifeboats, the Stornoway Coastguard rescue helicopter, various local vessels, Gairloch and Ewe Coastguard Rescue Teams, Police and the Red Cross have all been searching the area since this morning in deteriorating weather conditions.

With nothing found from todays search effort, the decision was made in consultation with Northern Constabulary, to suspend operations for today. Coastguard Rescue Team members will resume coastline searches on Tuesday.

Carol Collins, Stornoway Coastguard Watch Manager said,

“Unfortunately despite best efforts by all those out searching today, the missing gentleman has not been found. Our thoughts are with the families of those involved in this tragic incident at this time.”  


-Ends-
 Notes to Editors


  1. Minimum recommended communications equipment for Dinghy sailors / canoeists / kayakers: hand held vhf, flares, charged mob phone

  1. The MCA recommends that [kayakers, canoeists, rowers, dinghy sailors and the like] wear buoyancy aids

  1. The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities.  Sea Vision promotes the importance and economic value of the sector and works to highlight the exciting range of activities and career opportunities available to young people within the UK growing maritime sector. www.seavisionuk.org

  1. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

MSC FLAMINIA AWAITING INSPECTION

The United Kingdom’s Secretary of State’s Representative for Maritime Salvage and Intervention (SOSREP) Hugh Shaw, has requested that the MSC Flaminia remains in a position 30 miles south of Lands End in order to allow SMIT Salvage to stabilise the ship.  This is in preparation for an international coastal state inspection team to board her to carry out an assessment prior to her getting approval to proceed to German territorial waters.

The team of six includes specialists in maritime salvage and fire fighting. The experts need to carry out a detailed inspection of the ship to make sure it is safe to transit the English Channel, Dover Strait and other coastal state waters during the passage to Germany.

Salvors are still taking steps to reduce the temperatures on board. The inspection team will be able to carry out their work once these risks are eliminated or reduced to an acceptable level and weather conditions allow them to board the vessel.

Once the inspection is complete the vessel will remain at its holding position 30 miles south of Lands End until the coastal states involved have had time to consider the report. They will then determine if there are any further requirements before the ship commences her transit towards German waters.

Hugh Shaw, SOSREP said:

“Until the coastal state inspection has taken place, and the results passed to the other coastal states en-route, the MSC Flaminia will not be given approval to proceed to Germany. SMIT Salvage will inform the UK and German authorities when they are satisfied that any risks have been reduced to an acceptable level and that it is then safe for the UK, French and German team to board the casualty and carry out the inspection.”

-Ends-

For further details contact:
The Maritime and Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
023 8032 9401

UPDATE ON LOCH GAIRLOCH SEARCH

The search resumed this morning for a 32 year old man following the capsizing of a canoe on Loch Gairloch yesterday.

Portree and Lochinver RNLI lifeboats launched this morning and other local vessels have also offered their help in the search.  Gairloch and Lochinver Coastguard Rescue Teams have been searching the shoreline and outlying islands.

The weather forecast for the search area today is winds South Easterly veering South Westerly force 5-7 for much of the day with rain and showers.

Carol Collins, Stornoway Coastguard Watch Manager said,
“The weather is less favourable for searching today than yesterday but units have been out searching since first light.  Sadly at this stage the search and rescue phase has now moved to a recovery mission.”  


-Ends-
 Notes to Editors

Communications:

  1. Minimum recommended communications equipment for Dinghy sailors / canoeists / kayakers: hand held vhf, flares, charged mob phone

  1. The MCA recommends that [kayakers, canoeists, rowers, dinghy sailors and the like] wear buoyancy aids

  1. The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities.  Sea Vision promotes the importance and economic value of the sector and works to highlight the exciting range of activities and career opportunities available to young people within the UK growing maritime sector. www.seavisionuk.org

  1. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

Sunday, 26 August 2012

CAPSIZED CANOE ON LOCH GAIRLOCH

A search is underway on Loch Gairloch in Scotland after a canoe capsized and six people fell in the water.

At 4.15pm Stornoway Coastguard was contacted by one of the party who had made it to shore and reported that their canoe had capsized and the rest of his group including another adult and four children were still in the water in the North West area of Gairloch.

Stornoway Coastguard launched a search of the area, involving the Coastguard Rescue Helicopter from Stornoway, Portree RNLI lifeboat, Gairloch and Loch Ewe Coastguard Rescue Teams and a number of local boats.  A local ambulance crew and the air ambulance from Inverness were also on scene.

Four children have been recovered from the water and transferred to hospital.  Search teams continue to look for the man who is still missing.

Conditions on scene are East to South Easterly winds up to force 5.



-Ends-
 Notes to Editors

Communications:

  1. Minimum recommended communications equipment for Dinghy sailors / canoeists / kayakers: hand held vhf, flares, charged mob phone

  1. The MCA recommends that [kayakers, canoeists, rowers, dinghy sailors and the like] wear buoyancy aids

  1. The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities.  Sea Vision promotes the importance and economic value of the sector and works to highlight the exciting range of activities and career opportunities available to young people within the UK growing maritime sector. www.seavisionuk.org

  1. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

Saturday, 25 August 2012

SEARCH FOR MAN OVERBOARD ON SCOTTISH WEST COAST

A man was recovered from the sea off the Isle of Coll after a search was triggered when his boat was spotted adrift.

At 11.10am Clyde Coastguard was contacted by staff from the local ferry company reporting a small drifting vessel off Arinagour on the Isle of Coll. 

Clyde Coastguard requested Tobermory RNLI lifeboat to launch and nine other vessels joined the search for the man who had been seen going out fishing earlier in the day and was presumed overboard.  A rescue helicopter from RAF Lossiemouth and Coll Coastguard Rescue Team also searched the area. 

The man was found in the water by one of the local boats at 12:30 and was airlifted by rescue helicopter to Oban Lorne and Isles Hospital where he was later declared deceased. 

The casualty was not wearing a lifejacket when found although a lifejacket was found in the water near by.


-Ends-
 Notes to Editors

1.      Carrying a VHF radio on your vessel is vital and VHF DSC (Digital Selective Calling) is strongly recommended. Ensure your radio equipment is fully working and you know what to do in an emergency. With DSC you can send a distress alert along with your exact position, with one touch of the button. The distress alert is repeated every four minutes until it is acknowledged either by a Coastguard Station (Ship to Shore) or by a vessel (Ship to Ship) within radio range.
  1. Maritime Mobile Service Identity (MMSI) numbers are programmed into a DSC radio set and an MMSI is issued as part of your radio licence application, via Ofcom. It consists of a series of nine digits, which are used to uniquely identify the radio on your vessel.

  1. The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities.  Sea Vision promotes the importance and economic value of the sector and works to highlight the exciting range of activities and career opportunities available to young people within the UK growing maritime sector. www.seavisionuk.org

  1. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch.

Friday, 24 August 2012

TWO FISHERMEN RESCUED FROM SEA OFF BIDEFORD

Two fishermen were rescued from the sea off Bideford this evening after their 16 ft fishing boat ‘Sophie Jane’ capsized on Bideford Bar

Swansea Coastguard was alerted to the men’s predicament by a 999 call from a member of the public at 6.12pm. The member of the public reported that he had seen an open boat with a red hull on the bar and it had now disappeared.

The Appledore RNLI Inshore Lifeboat was sent to the scene where they found two men sitting on the upturned hull of the boat. They managed to refloat the vessel and brought it, and the two crew men, back to Appledore where they were met by the Westward Ho Coastguard Rescue Team.

 David Jones Swansea Coastguard Watch Manager said;
“It appears that the fishing vessel broke down on its way back to Bideford and was tipped over by the waves on the Bideford Bar. It happened so quickly that the crew didn’t have time to call for assistance and were lucky that a member of the public spotted the vessel disappearing from the horizon. Luckily the men didn’t need any medical attention.

“We recommend that commercial fishermen wear a personal floatation device and that all vessels are fitted with VHF DSC radio equipment that can sent a distress alert. It should also be linked up to GPS so an accurate position of your vessel is received by the Coastguard.”

-Ends-

Tuesday, 21 August 2012

UK AND FRANCE SEND TEAM TO INSPECT STRICKEN SHIP

The United Kingdom Secretary of State’s representative for Maritime and Salvage Intervention (SOSREP) Hugh Shaw and the French Maritime authorities have decided to send a team of experts to inspect the MSC Flaminia.

To give these experts access to the ship it will be brought to a position 30 miles from the UK. This should enable the inspection team to board the vessel on Friday (subject to circumstances and weather conditions) to carry out a detailed inspection.

The team will include two internationally recognised experts specialising in marine salvage and fire fighting and a specialist fire fighting expert from the Prefecture Maritime.

The outcome of the inspection will be made available to all coastal States currently involved with the incident and will enable them to determine if there are any further requirements before the ship transits the English Channel en-route to German Territorial waters.


Hugh Shaw, SOSREP said:
 

"Much has been done to stabilise the ship since the accident last month. The inspection team will be able to board the ship and carry out an expert analysis and evaluation. Their report will be passed to all the coastal States along the intended route to Germany and will assist with their decision making and approval processes.”

-Ends-

Sunday, 19 August 2012

SEARCH FOR MISSING CHILD AT BURNHAM-ON-SEA


A search involving a helicopter, coastguard rescue teams and two lifeboats is ongoing near the jetty at Burnham-on-Sea for a missing 4-year-old that was seen entering the water.  The parents of the child have been treated on scene after they went in after the boy and required medical treatment for water ingestion.

A member of the public dialled 999 at 6.04 pm to inform Swansea Coastguard that they had seen two adults go in the water to attempt to rescue a small child and that they needed medical assistance.  Swansea Coastguard sent the Burnham-on-Sea Coastguard Rescue Team to the scene, along with the two Burnham-on-Sea RNLI lifeboats.   The Coastguard Rescue helicopter from Portland is also on scene, along with a Police helicopter and Avon Ambulance Service.  The search is currently still ongoing.

Saturday, 18 August 2012

PLEASURE VESSEL BEACHED AT REDCAR


A pleasure vessel with three anglers on board was beached at Redcar this morning after taking on water two nautical miles offshore.

People on board the vessel ‘Ocean Pearl’ contacted Humber Coastguard at 9.10 this morning to let them know that they were rapidly taking on water and were out of Hartlepool.  Humber Coastguard requested that the two Hartlepool RNLI lifeboats attend and bring a pump to attempt to pump out some of the water.  However, when plotting the position of the vessel, the Coastguard ascertained that they were actually offshore of Redcar, and so the two Redcar RNLI lifeboats were requested to launch.  Three vessels that were in the area also immediately proceeded to offer assistance.  Concerned at the speed at which the vessel was taking on water, the rescue helicopter at RAF Leconfield was also sent to the scene.

The vessel ‘Samantha’ arrived on scene at 09.17 and began towing the vessel back to shore whilst the crew attempted to bail out the water with buckets.  The Redcar RNLI lifeboat arrived on scene at 09.29 and brought pumps on board, and the Hartlepool lifeboats arrived on scene at 09.35 and did the same.  The pumps were only just able to cope with the amount of water flowing into the vessel.

At 09.48 the decision was taken to beach the vessel at Redcar, with the three crew brought ashore safe and well and passed into the care of the coastguard team.

 Graham Dawson, Watch Manager, Humber Coastguard said:

“We were extremely concerned at the rate at which the Ocean Pearl was taking on water and so it was imperative that we had rescue resources on scene as soon as possible should the situation worsen.  The RNLI lifeboats brought pumps on board the casualty vessel but the water was flowing in quickly and so the decision was made to beach the Ocean Pearl at Redcar and bring the crew ashore.  We would like to thank the other vessels in the area that offered assistance, and the ‘Samantha’ for towing her to safety.” 

Tuesday, 14 August 2012

YOUNG MEN RESCUED FROM INCOMING TIDE

Two young men were rescued tonight after they were cut off by the tide as they walked from Southport to Crosby.

Liverpool Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre received a 999 call from a member of the public at 8.10pm reporting that the two men were on a thin sandbank at the mouth of the River Alt.

The Crosby Coastguard Rescue Team, the RNLI hovercraft and Inshore Lifeboat from New Brighton and the Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service went straight to the scene. The RNLI hovercraft rescued two men at just before 8.45pm.

Liverpool Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre Watch Manager Paul Parkes said:
“These two young men were very lucky as the water had come in up to their knees by the time they were rescued.

“Our advice is to always check the weather and tide times before you set out. Please don’t take risks and think about whether you could be cut-off before you reach your destination.”

-Ends-


COASTGUARDS WARN BEACH USERS TO BEWARE OF RIP CURRENTS FOLLOWING TWO NEAR MISSES

Coastguards are issuing a strong safety message this afternoon as tragedies were narrowly avoided on the Northumberland and South Wales coastlines.

At 1.30 pm, multiple 999 calls where received from onlookers at St Aidan’s Beach, Seahouses, as two teenage girls got into difficulty in a rip current. Battling the strong current, one of them managed to get to safety but with one girl still in the water, her brother attempted the rescue himself.

Both Inshore and All Weather RNLI Lifeboats from Seahouses were requested to launch and the Seahouses Coastguard Rescue Team were requested to attend. Rescue Helicopter 131 from RAF Boulmer was also diverted to the scene. As the 999 calls continued, it emerged that the father of both boy and girl had also gone into the water but had abandoned his rescue as he could not fight the tide. Though exhausted, the boy and girl managed to get ashore themselves but required some urgent medical attention. They were evacuated to hospital by the Rescue Helicopter along with the other girl.

Being cold, shocked and having swallowed a lot of sea water, the three teenagers are now being treated at the Wansbeck Hospital, Newbiggin and Humber Coastguard cannot stress enough the importance of awareness of tides and currents when on the beach especially if visiting the area on holiday.

At 2.30 pm Swansea Coastguard received a 999 call from a woman on a beach at Three Cliff Bay on the South Gower coast. Her three young children and their father were in difficulty in the water and were battling with a rip current. The rescue helicopter from RAF Chivenor was scrambled, the Mumbles Inshore Lifeboat was launched and the Oxwich Coastguard Rescue Team were sent to the scene. The Coastguard also broadcast a distress message to which several vessels responded.

One of the children had managed to make it to rocks and was rescued by the lifeboat from there. The other two children and their father were picked up from the water by the lifeboat. All four were airlifted to Morriston Hospital suffering with water ingestion and shock.
Mike Puplett, Humber Coastguard Watch Manager says:
 ‘These children, teenagers and adults have been extremely lucky today, and we are thankful of a safe outcome. Strong currents are unforgiving, and I urge all beach users and bathers to be aware of the inherent dangers. Two men attempted self rescue, and were also overcome themselves.”

David Jones, Swansea Coastguard Watch Manager says:
"If you are visiting the beach, try to go to one which is patrolled by lifeguards and swim between the flags. Take notice of any warning signs. In an emergency tell the lifeguard if one is available or if on a unguarded beach call 999 and ask for the Coastguard.’

MAN DIES AFTER BEING WASHED OFF ROCKS WHILST ANGLING

At 01.52 this afternoon, Falmouth Coastguard received a 999 call from a young man reporting that his friend was in trouble in the sea. The man had run to life saving apparatus that was positioned nearby. He used the perry bouy, to throw to his friend who was unfortunately unable to reach it.
Falmouth Coastguard called out the Boscastle and Port Isaac Coastguard rescue teams, and requested the launch of the Port Isaac RNLI inshore lifeboat and requested a rescue helicopter. The Trebarwith beach lifeguards also paddled their board to the location.
One man was winched from the water by the rescue helicopter and taken to hospital.
The weather conditions in the area are Southerly Force 4, which was producing a heavy swell, and good visibility.
The man was washed off the rocks and his friend made every effort to save him.
The man has now been declared dead at hospital.
Neil Oliver, Watch Manager, Falmouth Coastguard said:
"The Coastguard advise that anglers who are fishing near the water’s edge and from an unstable platform (such as rocks) should wear a lifejacket or buoyancy aid.
"If you are undertaking activities at the coast, it is advisable to have a means of communication in case of emergency."

Monday, 13 August 2012

WHALE BEACHED ON CARLYON BEACH

A rescue operation is now underway to save a 45-foot long whale that beached itself on Carlyon Beach, Cornwall this afternoon.

A member of the public contacted Brixham Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre at just before a quarter to five this afternoon to report that a 45-foot long whale had beached itself on Carlyon Beach, Cornwall. The whale, which is believed to be a Fin Whale was reported to be alive and thrashing about in the shallow water.

Brixham Coastguard alerted British Divers Marine Life Rescue. Two vets from this volunteer group are now on scene. St Austell Coastguard Rescue Team and Devon and Cornwall Police are also on scene to assist the marine rescue team and make sure the public do not cause the whale further distress.

Brixham Coastguard Watch Manager Paul Myers said:

“It’s obviously a very distressing scene and we would ask the public to stay away from the beach to allow the rescue unit to do their work and save the whale from further distress.”

-Ends-

Notes to Editors

  1. Follow us on Twitter. Find us at MCA_media
 
  1. British Marine Divers Marine Life Rescue is a voluntary network of trained marine mammal medics who respond to call outs. They are the only marine animal rescue organisation operating across England, Wales and Scotland. They have a wide range of equipment strategically placed throughout the country to deal with strandings of marine animals, This includes rescue boats, equipment trailers, whale and dolphin pontoon sets and a whale disentanglement kit.


Friday, 10 August 2012

UK SHIP REGISTER OBTAINS US COASTGUARD QUALSHIP21 AWARD


The UK Ship Register has been recognised by the United States Coast Guard (USCG) for their excellent Port State Control record, listing them as one of the few shipping flag administrations to retain the prestigious Qualship 21 for 2012-13.

This award means that ships registered to the UK will not be targeted for inspection by American Port State Control inspectors.

Head of the UK Ship Register Debasis Mazumdar said:
“Thanks to the high standards applied by the MCA’s Marine Surveyors, ships registered in the UK will not be targeted for surprise inspection by American Port State Control inspectors. This will give continued support and a commercial advantage to the ships registered to us.

“Qualship 21 is a demanding quality standard for shipping set by the United States Coastguard. This is a great achievement for the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) and shows the high quality of ships registered to us.”

-Ends-

Notes to Editors:
Qualship 21 is the USCG’s matrix system of extending recognition to "foreign" ships, which demonstrate an excellent safety and pollution prevention record. Ships in the Qualship 21 system are required to undergo significantly less Port State Control inspections by the USCG whilst in US waters.
In order to qualify:
  1. the Flag State or Registry must have less than a 1% detention ratio in the US over a three-year rolling average.
  2. the Flag State must have completed or planned to take part in the IMO Voluntary Member State Audit Scheme (VMSAS).
  3. the Flag State must have submitted its Self-Assessment Questionnaire to the International Maritime Organisation.
  4. no detentions of or violations by the vessel in US waters within the previous 36 months.
  5. the vessel must have completed a successful USCG Port State Control inspection within the previous 12 months.
  6. the shipping company must have a detention-free fleet in US waters for the past 24 months.
  7. the vessel must be classed with a "non-targeted" classification society.

Wednesday, 8 August 2012

ANOTHER ROCK FALL ON DORSET COAST

HM Coastguard is warning of the continuing dangers of rock falls and land slides on the Dorset coast after a major rock fall near Charmouth today.

Lyme Regis and West Bay Coastguard Rescue Teams, the Coastguard Rescue Helicopter from Portland and Dorset Police attended the scene following a report of a significant rock fall to the east of Charmouth. A vessel at sea had seen the fall and witnessed five people on the beach between Charmouth and Golden Cap despite all the recent warnings. Lyme Regis RNLI Inshore Lifeboat and Weymouth Coastguard Sector Manager who were in the vicinity also attended.

On arrival on scene, the five people were identified, accounted for and asked to leave the area due to the continued risk. It was established that there were no other people missing.

Maddy Davey, Portland Coastguard Watch Manager says.

“The cliffs along the West Dorset coast are very unstable following the extensive rain earlier this year and in certain areas it remains extremely unsafe to walk along the beach.  We are especially concerned about the risk after the death which happened in July at Burton Bradstock.”

-Ends-
 Notes to Editors

  1. The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities.  Sea Vision promotes the importance and economic value of the sector and works to highlight the exciting range of activities and career opportunities available to young people within the UK growing maritime sector. www.seavisionuk.org

  1. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

FISHING VESSEL COLLISION WITH SOUTHEND ON SEA PIER LANDS SKIPPER IN COURT

At a hearing today at Southend Magistrates Court, John William Smith, the skipper of the Fishing Vessel ‘Paul Patrick’, pleaded guilty to one charge under maritime safety legislation.  He was fined £3,000 plus costs of £9,888.28. He was given 14 days to pay.
The ‘Paul Patrick’ (H11031) is a UK registered 9.6m fishing vessel which operates from the port of Leigh-on-Sea.  Shortly after 07:05am on the 17th February 2012 the Paul Patrick collided with Southend-on-Sea Pier.
CCTV in operation on the pier recorded the incident.  The CCTV captured the final moments of the Paul Patrick hitting the pier at more than five knots.  Three people on the vessel were seen to run from the stern towards the bow immediately after the collision.  The ‘Paul Patrick’ was stuck hard and fast to the pier and as several members of the public watched, the crew used angle grinders to release the vessel.  At the time of the collision the tide was at its highest.
 At a later date the skipper of the ‘Paul Patrick’, Mr John William Smith was interviewed by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency Enforcement Branch.  Mr Smith admitted that he had failed to keep a proper lookout as he was checking his catch from the last trawl.
In passing sentence the Magistrates said:
"We do not find this to be a momentary lapse of concentration. You are an experienced skipper but we take into account your early guilt plea.”
Mike Greenwood of the MCA Marine Office at Orpington said:
 "Southend Pier is the longest pleasure pier in the world being one and half miles long.  In its 200 year history there have been several recorded collisions causing substantial damage.   This incident should remind crews of all vessels that they need to ensure a proper lookout is maintained at all times.
I would like to thank Southend-on-Sea Council for their help and co-operation in this matter.”
 

Tuesday, 7 August 2012

MISSING KAYAKER FOUND DEAD IN ESSEX

Following an overnight search on the Essex coast a missing kayaker was found deceased this morning at Bradwell.

At 3am Thames Coastguard was contacted by Essex Police who had received a call from the kayaker’s partner reporting that he was overdue after going out kayaking the previous afternoon between 2 and 4pm. .  

Thames Coastguard launched a search of the area, involving Burnham and West Mersea RNLI lifeboats, South Woodham Ferrers Coastguard Rescue Team and Eseex Police and Essex Ambulance Service.  Shore searchers were also attempting to locate his vehicle in order to better pin point the starting point of his trip.

The man was found early this morning by a walker on the coast at Bradwell and was pronounced dead at the scene by Essex Ambulance Service paramedics.  He was 59 years old and from the Burnham On Crouch area.

Aimee Rampton, Thames Coastguard Watch Manager said,

“HM Coastguard recommends that you don’t go out alone in a small craft like a kayak.  Secondly, it is vital that you give full details to a shore contact including your starting point for the trip, where you are going and when you will be back.

There was a big squall which came through the area on Monday afternoon, severe enough to cause a problem to even experienced kayakers.  Sadly, you cannot always predict conditions at sea even when they appear benign when you set off.”



-Ends-
 Notes to Editors

1.      Carrying a VHF radio on your vessel is vital and VHF DSC (Digital Selective Calling) is strongly recommended. Ensure your radio equipment is fully working and you know what to do in an emergency. With DSC you can send a distress alert along with your exact position, with one touch of the button. The distress alert  is repeated every four minutes until it is acknowledged either by a Coastguard Station (Ship to Shore) or by a vessel (Ship to Ship) within radio range.
  1. Maritime Mobile Service Identity (MMSI) numbers are programmed into a DSC radio set and an MMSI is issued as part of your radio licence application, via Ofcom. It consists of a series of nine digits, which are used to uniquely identify the radio on your vessel.

  1. The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities.  Sea Vision promotes the importance and economic value of the sector and works to highlight the exciting range of activities and career opportunities available to young people within the UK growing maritime sector. www.seavisionuk.org

  1. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

Monday, 6 August 2012

LIFE JACKET WARNING FROM SWANSEA COASTGUARD

Crew from a grounded sailing yacht were taken ashore by lifeboats this afternoon in Cardiff Bay.

At 4.20pm Swansea Coastguard received a report that a grounded yacht with ten people on board was in difficulty on the Wrach Channel in Cardiff Bay. 

The 34 foot sailing yacht had gone aground on it’s passage through the Wrach Channel to the Locks.  There were three children on board and seven adults.  Penarth RNLI inshore lifeboats were able to take four of the passengers ashore before the vessel was later refloated. 

Swansea Coastguard Watch Manager David Jones said,

“There was concern for the safety of those on board the grounded yacht and there were not enough life jackets.  It is vital that when going afloat you carry enough life jackets for everyone on board and make sure that your crew know what to do in an emergency.”



-Ends-
 Notes to Editors

1.      Carrying a VHF radio on your vessel is vital and VHF DSC (Digital Selective Calling) is strongly recommended. Ensure your radio equipment is fully working and you know what to do in an emergency. With DSC you can send a distress alert along with your exact position, with one touch of the button. The distress alert  is repeated every four minutes until it is acknowledged either by a Coastguard Station (Ship to Shore) or by a vessel (Ship to Ship) within radio range.
  1. Maritime Mobile Service Identity (MMSI) numbers are programmed into a DSC radio set and an MMSI is issued as part of your radio licence application, via Ofcom. It consists of a series of nine digits, which are used to uniquely identify the radio on your vessel.

  1. The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities.  Sea Vision promotes the importance and economic value of the sector and works to highlight the exciting range of activities and career opportunities available to young people within the UK growing maritime sector. www.seavisionuk.org

Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

Sunday, 5 August 2012

CREW RESCUED FROM SINKING MOTOR BOAT

Belfast Coastguard coordinated the rescue of the crew of a motorboat this afternoon after it was swamped by a large wave and sank near Barmouth, Castlerock. The vessel broadcast a mayday message at 12.45 this afternoon which was acknowledged by Malin Head Coast Guard who then passed coordination to Belfast Coastguard.
Castlerock RNLI Beach Lifeguard Unit were quickly on scene with a Rescue Water Craft. Coleraine Coastguard Rescue Team was also sent to the scene and the Portrush RNLI inshore lifeboat was requested to launch.
The two people, one male and one female, were rescued from their sinking boat by the lifeguards and taken back to shore onboard the Rescue Water Craft.
Gary Young, Belfast Coastguard Watch Manager says:
“Both people are now safe and well. They were wearing their lifejackets at the time of the incident and made a mayday broadcast as soon as their vessel became swamped meaning that we could get rescuers to them quickly.”