Thursday, 28 June 2012

SAILOR TRAPPED UNDER DINGHY


A man was taken to hospital this evening after he was rescued from beneath his capsized dinghy, off Dale in Pembrokeshire.

Milford Haven Coastguard responded to an emergency ‘Mayday’ call at . It was reported that the laser had capsized with two crew aboard, one of which was trapped underneath the hull of the dinghy. A Rescue helicopter from RAF Chivenor was scrambled and the RNLI all weather and inshore lifeboat from Angle were requested to launch. Coastguard Rescue officers from Dale were sent to the scene and the Welsh Ambulance Service was in attendance.

Roger Reed, Watch Manager, Milford Haven Coastguard, says:

“A man in his thirties was rescued by the lifeboat crew and transferred to Withybush General Hospital by helicopter.”

Saturday, 23 June 2012

TWO PEOPLE CUT OFF BY TIDE AT SEAFORD


Two people were rescued by helicopter from Splash Point near Seaford Head in East Sussex this afternoon after becoming cut off by the tide in an area inaccessible to either the RNLI lifeboat or the Coastguard Water Rescue team.

A member of the public contacted Solent Coastguard at 11.50 am reporting that they could see what they thought was two children at the end of the esplanade at Seaford, who were waving and shouting for help with the tide coming in around them.  Solent Coastguard sent the Newhaven Coastguard Rescue Team to the scene and requested the launch of the Newhaven RNLI lifeboat.  The lifeboat arrived on scene at 12.15 pm but unfortunately the sea conditions were too rough for them to safely access the beach where the two people were stranded.  They also assessed the conditions and concluded that it would be unsafe for a Coastguard team to attempt access to the area on foot. As a consequence, and having  consulted with the Air Rescue Coordination Centre (ARCC) at Kinloss, Solent Coastguard scrambled the Coastguard helicopter.  The Newhaven Coastguard rescue team arrived on scene at 12.45 and assisted in preparing a landing site for the helicopter on the golf course above the cliffs.  The two adults, aged 25 and 26, were airlifted to the golf course unharmed with no medical attention required, and given safety advice by Coastguard officers.

Solent Coastguard Watch Officer Liz Hanson said:

“The two people involved in this incident were local to Slough but visiting the coast for the day when they became cut off by the tide.  They were not aware of the nature of the tides and, being originally from Lithuania, they were also not aware of the emergency telephone numbers, so they were lucky they were spotted by members of the public who were able to raise the alarm.  We always advise members of the public to check the tide times before setting out on a coastal walk, and if they do get into difficulty, to dial 999 and ask for the Coastguard.”

Thursday, 21 June 2012

SAILING CLUBS HIT BY SQUALL OFF DORSET COAST

Three sailing clubs had their activities disrupted tonight when a passing squall caused their dinghies to either capsize or to be blown off course.

Portland Coastguard received the first call from the rowing boat Isolde at just before 7pm. The boat reported that two dinghies had capsized on either side of Weymouth Harbour. There was a safety boat in the area but the rowing boat was asked to keep watching until the dinghies were safely being towed back to the harbour.

At 7.20pm Swanage Sailing Club contacted Portland Coastguard to report that a Dart catamaran with two crew onboard appeared to be in difficulties in Swanage Bay after the squall. Swanage RNLI Inshore Lifeboat was sent to the scene and Swanage Coastguard Rescue Team went to a vantage point then to the sailing club. When the lifeboat arrived on scene they found that the propeller on the safety boat had been fouled and so the lifeboat towed both the catamaran and safety boat back to Swanage.

Highcliffe Sailing Club raised concern just before 7.45pm for five dinghies to the east of Christchurch Harbour that had been caught in the squall. Mudeford RNLI lifeboat was training in the area and so was asked to go to help the dinghies. The lifeboat took one person from a dinghy and towed the dinghy back to the sailing club while the safety boat accompanied the other four boats back to the sailing club. Here they were met by Southbourne Coastguard Rescue Team.

Maddy Davey Portland Coastguard Watch Manager said;

“The forecast is for a complex area of low pressure to bring very unsettled and, at times, windy conditions to all areas which means that the wind can quickly change from benign to gale force. The thundery conditions mentioned in the forecast can also sometimes be preceded by squalls. 
 
“I’m happy to say that all the sailing clubs had safety boats with them and the crews normally wear lifejackets and buoyancy aids so all the sailors returned home safely. Nevertheless, these vessels were caught out and the unseasonable conditions are a reminder that it’s important for everyone planning to go sailing to check the weather and tides before you set out, then consider whether your plan should still be implemented or postponed until the conditions are more favourable.”

Sunday, 17 June 2012

PENSIONER RESCUED FROM THE MUD AT CROSBY

A pensioner was rescued from the mud at Crosby Beach, Sefton this afternoon after she had been stuck for over an hour.

She was found, stuck up to her waist, at 4pm today by RNLI beach lifeguards on a routine patrol of Crosby Beach, Sefton. The 70 year-old local woman had been trying to raise the alarm for over an hour by shouting at dog walkers and beach users (there were around 50 in the area) but they hadn’t heard her. 

The Lifeguards contact MRCC Liverpool to explain the situation. The Coastguard Rescue team from Crosby, who specialise in mud rescue, were sent to the scene and the woman was quickly pulled from the mud by the Coastguards with assistance from the lifeguards.

It’s believed that the recent heavy rain has created an area of mud approximately the size of four car park spaces in an area that is normally soft sand around 200m north of Seaforth docks.

The woman was taken by the Crosby Coastguard Rescue team to Liverpool Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre where she recovered from her shock and exhaustion.

Su Daintith Liverpool Coastguard Watch Manager said;

“Recent heavy rains have transformed some areas of soft sand in to quick sand.

“If you do become stuck in mud stay as calm as you can, spread your weight as much as possible and if you have a mobile phone dial 999 and ask for the coastguard. If you don’t have a phone slowly wave your arms above your head and shout to try and attract attention.

“You should also discourage others from attempting to rescue you because without the proper equipment they could become stuck too.”

-Ends-
 

TWO GIRLS RESCUED FROM THE MUD AT LANGSTONE HARBOUR

Two girls were rescued from the mud in Langstone Harbour, Portsmouth this afternoon after they went to rescue their dog and became stuck themselves.

At just before 3pm Hampshire Fire and Rescue called Solent Coastguard to say they had been called to rescue two girls from the mud in Langstone Harbour, just off the Eastern Road, Portsmouth. Two girls had been playing with their dog when they thought it had become stuck in the mud. They went to rescue it and became stuck up to their waists. The dog managed to free itself and made it back to solid ground.

Solent Coastguard sent Portsmouth, Hillhead and Hayling Island Coastguard Rescue teams who are all trained in mud rescue.  South Central Ambulance and Hampshire Police were also sent to the scene to assist.

Using specialist mud equipment the girls were freed at just before 4.15pm.

Katharine Piggin Solent Coastguard Watch Manager said;
“The heavy recent rain and incoming tides can create areas of quicksand which quickly suck you in.

“If your dog becomes stuck in mud please don’t try to free it yourself as you can become stuck yourself.

“If you do become stuck in mud you should try and spread your weight as much as possible and if you have a mobile phone dial 999 and ask for the coastguard. Avoid moving and stay as calm as you can. You should also discourage others from attempting to rescue you because without the proper equipment they could become stuck too.”
-Ends-


Saturday, 16 June 2012

CYCLE RIDE COMES TO A STICKY END

A cycle ride came to a sticky end this afternoon when a 51 year-old male cyclist was rescued from the mud near a track between Milford on Sea and Barton on Sea, Hampshire.

At just before 2pm the man called 999 to report that he was stuck in the mud just off the track at Taddiford Gap after coming down the cycle track from the car park.

Solent Coastguard sent Coastguard Rescue teams from Lymington and Southbourne to the scene with a specialist Coastguard mud rescue team from Hilllhead. Hampshire Fire and Rescue and South Central Ambulance were also asked to assist.

The man had been walking along the beach with his bike when he noticed that the tide was coming in. He tried to make his way further up the beach but soon his trainers became stuck in the mud. In attempting to take his shoes off, he found himself sinking further into the mud – by this time up to knees. At this point he decided to call for help. This was just as well, as by the time he was finally rescued at just before 2.40pm, by a combination of Coastguard and Fire & Rescue equipment, he had continued to sink up to his waist. There was also the added risk of the unstable cliff  above him showing signs of imminent collapse.

Mike O’Sullivan - Solent Coastguard Watch Manager said;

“The heavy recent rain and incoming tides can create areas of quicksand which quickly suck you in.

“If you become stuck in mud you should try and spread your weight as much as possible and, if you have a mobile phone, dial 999 and ask for the Coastguard. Avoid moving and stay as calm as you can. You should also discourage other well meaning members of the public from attempting to rescue you because, without the proper equipment, they could become stuck too. Before you set out to explore the beaches and coastline in your area, always remember to check the times of High and Low Water and plan your trip accordingly.


-Ends-

 Notes to Editors


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Friday, 15 June 2012

Coastguards help Highlands and Islands Fire & Rescue Service

Coastguards from Stornoway, Ness, South Lochs, Bragar and Breasclete are helping Highlands and Islands Fire & Rescue Service to tackle a large forest fire.

The Coastguard Rescue teams are supplying manpower, vehicles and trailers to transport fire service personnel, hoses and pumps to the scene of the fire.

Friday, 8 June 2012

Strong winds prove too much for Kite Surfers

Today's strong winds and rough seas have created conditions that have really proved too much for the ability of some kite surfers around the East Anglian coast.

Yarmouth Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre was alerted three time this afternoon to assist kite surfers in difficulties around the Hunstanton area. The Hunstanton Coastguard Rescue Team and the Hunstanton RNLI Lifeboat were sent to each incident. The Ambulance Paramedic, the Air Ambulance and a land Ambulance were sent to the third incident where a Kite surfer was taken to hospital.

Mario Siano, Yarmouth Coastguard Watch Manager said:
"I know that kite surfers enjoy extreme conditions but with a severe weather warning was out and winds were gusting to more than 50 miles an hour.

"My best advice is make sure you get weather information before you take to the water and don't go out in conditions that are beyond your experience."

Thursday, 7 June 2012

Falmouth Coastguard assisting Japanese Coastguard in two rowing incidents in Pacific Ocean


At 2.04 am today, Falmouth Coastguard received a distress signal from a British registered EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon) with a position in the Japanese search and rescue region.

Falmouth Coastguard was able to check the registered details of the EPIRB on their database and passed the information to the Japanese Coastguard.

This information is invaluable in the early stages of any search and rescue mission as it aids the search and rescue coordinators in knowing what type of vessel or craft they will be looking for and also in obtaining further information as to how many people are involved.

This EPIRB is registered to Sarah Outen who has been undertaking a challenge to row the Pacific Ocean fromJapan to San Francisco in an ocean rowing boat called Gulliver.

Further to that distress alert, at 9.07 this morning, Falmouth Coastguard received a call from the shore contact of Charlie Martell, who is also attempting to row the Pacific Ocean from Japan to Washington in an ocean rowing boat called Blossom.  He had also activated his EPIRB.

Falmouth Coastguard are communicating with the Japanese Coastguard and assisting in the rescue of these two British Citizens

Both these adventurers have been caught in a tropical typhoon and have declared a distress situation and called Mayday by the activation of their EPIRBs.

The Japanese Coastguard is now undertaking a search and a rescue mission to rescue both the rowers. They have sent a Coastguard rescue vessel and are also over-flying the area in long range fixed wing aircraft.

Terry Collins, Watch Manager, Falmouth Coastguard said:

The Global Maritime and Distress Safety System (GMDSS) is a maritime communications system for all vessels.

There are several elements that make up this system dependent on what type of craft you are and where you are traveling.

One of the key elements of an EPIRB is the correct and up to date registration of this device.


Notes to Editors:

Further information on EPIRBs can be obtained by contacting the EPIRB Registry on 01326 211569.

Solo yachtsman triggers beacon in rough seas off Lizard


A solo yachtsman who set out from Plymouth to join a sailing challenge bound for the Azores set off a beacon that was received by Falmouth Coastguard this morning, prompting a search and rescue mission to find the sailor.

At 7.25 am Falmouth Coastguard received a notification from a UK registered Personal Locator Beacon that was transmitting 40 miles south of the Lizard.  Falmouth Coastguard telephoned the registered contact details for the beacon and spoke to a woman who confirmed that her son was in possession of the beacon and that he had set off from Plymouth last Friday on a 22-foot sailing vessel as part of the ‘Jester Challenge’ to sail to the Azores.

Falmouth Coastguard issued a Mayday relay message to ask for assistance from vessels in the area, which was responded to by two vessels, the ‘Grace II’ and the ‘Baltic Advance’.  Falmouth Coastguard also sent the Rescue Helicopter from RNAS Culdrose to the location of the beacon, along with requesting the launch of the Lizard RNLI Lifeboat.  A French Customs Aircraft that was also in the area agreed to assist in the search.  The weather on scene was particularly poor, with the lifeboat battling through force 9 strong gales and very rough seas to reach the yachtsman in distress.

At 9.04 am the Grace II confirmed they had spotted the casualty vessel, with the Baltic Advance, French aircraft and Royal Navy helicopter all arriving minutes later.  The crew on board the helicopter were able to talk to the yachtsman over VHF radio, and he confirmed that he wanted to be taken off the vessel, which was being overcome by the rough seas and high waves.  The lone sailor was then taken to RNAS Culdrose, where he is now being looked after by the Mission to Seafarers.  The vessel has been abandoned.

Terry Collins, Watch Manager, Falmouth Coastguard said:

“The single handed sailor, who had sailed from his home in Jersey to Plymouth before setting off to join the sailing challenge to the Azores, set off his Personal Locator Beacon as his yacht was being overcome by the incredibly rough seas.  The conditions on scene today are not suitable for a small craft such as this and we do advise anyone setting out on the water take heed of weather forecasts and do not make journeys in conditions unsuitable for their vessel.  The locator beacon was crucial in the ability to rescue this person, as it was the only form of distress received ashore.  For offshore voyages leisure sailors are recommended to carry a satellite form of communication.”

Sunday, 3 June 2012

CUT OFF BY TIDE

A man in his thirties got cut off by the tide at Countisbury Cove, Devon this afternoon.

Swansea Coastguard received a call from the man’s friend at a nearby shop informing them that his friend had climbed down to the shoreline and was now stranded.

Coastguard Rescue officers from Lynmouth were sent to the area and the Rescue helicopter from RAF Chivenor was scrambled.

David Jones, Watch Manager, Swansea Coastguard, says:

“‘The man we believe was visiting the area with two friends when he decided to climb down to the shoreline, where he became stranded.  The Rescue helicopter was able to winch him to a position of safety and into the care of the Coastguard Rescue officers.

We would like to remind the public if you are not familiar with the stretch of coastline you are visiting to check the weather and tidal conditions before you set out, so that you can prepare accordingly. This will prevent you from becoming cut off by the tide and not put you at risk. If in doubt contact the coastguard or in an emergency ring ‘999’ and ask for the coastguard.”

Notes to Editors:

  • Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch
                                                                                                                     
  • Follow us on Twitter. We can be found at  MCA_media

  • The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities  http://www.seavisionuk.org/

                                                                          

For further details contact:
The Maritime and Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
Office hours: 023 8032 9401
Mobile: 07764 624 505
Press releases and further information about the Agency is available on the Web at www.dft.gov.uk/mca

Saturday, 2 June 2012

SUCCESSFUL OUTCOME IN SEARCH FOR TWO MISSING DIVERS


A successful search was undertaken this afternoon for two missing divers off the Copeland Islands at the entrance to Belfast Lough.

Belfast Coastguard received a VHF radio call on channel 16 at this afternoon from the ‘Ballyholme’ dive club boat reporting that two divers were overdue whilst conducting a drift dive. 

Belfast Coastguard put out a Mayday relay broadcast to all vessels in the area to assist in the search. A Rescue helicopter was scrambled via Dublin Coast Guard. RNLI all weather lifeboats from Donaghadee and Larne along with the inshore Bangor lifeboat were requested to launch by Belfast Coastguard. Coastguard Rescue Officers from Bangor were sent to conduct a coastal search in the vicinity of Orlock Point.

Gary Young, Watch Manager, Belfast Coastguard, says:

“Cobblers Den, a vessel on scene, located the two divers and assisted with their recovery from the water into Bangor lifeboat.  The two divers were then transferred onto Donaghadee lifeboat to be medically assessed.  The divers were reported as being fit and well and no further medical attention was required.

Belfast Coastguard would like to thank all the vessels that responded to the Mayday relay broadcast.”


Notes to Editors:

  • Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch
                                                                                                                     
  • Follow us on Twitter. We can be found at  MCA_media

  • The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities  http://www.seavisionuk.org/

                                                                          

For further details contact:
The Maritime & Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
Office hours: 023 8032 9401
Mobile: 07764 624 505
Press releases and further information about the Agency is available on the Web at www.mcga.gov.uk

FATALITY ON CAPSIZED VESSEL OFF GREENOCK

A small vessel capsized with three people aboard this afternoon off Greenock.

Clyde Coastguard received a call from the Clyde Port at informing them of a capsized vessel off Greenock Ocean Terminal.  

The Coastguard immediately scrambled the Royal Navy Rescue helicopter from RNAS Prestwick and the Helensburgh Inshore RNLI lifeboat was requested to launch, Coastguard Rescue Officers from Greenock were sent to the area and the MOD Police Launch ‘Lewis’ assisted as well as a local dive boat ‘Seren Lass’.

Graeme Watters, Watch Manager, Clyde Coastguard, says:


"One person made it to the shore with assistance and the other two were recovered and then put into the care of the waiting ambulance.  They have been taken to Inverclyde Royal Infirmary. We have been informed that one of the three men has sadly lost his life, our thoughts are with his family and friends at this tragic time.”


Notes to Editors:


  • Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch.                                                                                                                    
  • Follow us on Twitter. We can be found at  MCA_media  
  • The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities  www.seavisionuk.org

                                                                              

    For further details contact:
    The Maritime and Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
    Office hours: 023 8032 9401
    Mobile: 07764 624 505
    Press releases and further information about the Agency is available on the Web at www.dft.gov.uk/mca