Wednesday, 30 November 2011

COUPLE RESCUED AFTER FAILED ATTEMPT TO CLIMB ABOARD YACHT

A couple in their sixties were rescued from the water in the River Teifi, Cardigan today after their attempt to climb aboard their yacht ended with them both in the water.

Milford Haven Coastguard received a call from a member of the public at just before this morning. A member of the public reported that a fully-dressed person was in the water hanging on to the side of a boat. Whilst the call was being made another member of the public rowed out to the casualties.

It later transpired that there were two people in the water. The first fell in when the tender overturned as she tried to board the yacht. The second jumped off the yacht to help. Neither were wearing life jackets and the weather was far from ideal, with strong gusty winds and a very high tide.

Cardigan RNLI Lifeboat was sent to the scene, with coastguard rescue officers from Gwbert, who met the casualties and looked after them until an ambulance arrived.

Mike Day, from Milford Haven Coastguard, said :

“Both these people were very lucky to have been seen in the water so quickly. Our thanks go to the member of the public who went to their aid and pulled both from the water. This also shows the importance of wearing a lifejacket even for the shortest trips”

 -Ends-

Notes to Editors

  1. Follow us on Twitter. Find us at MCA_media

Monday, 28 November 2011

UPDATE: SEARCH FOR MISSING RUSSIAN CREWMEN

Eleven coastguard rescue teams and an RAF helicopter have completed a search of the north Wales coast this morning, following the loss of the cargo carrier ‘Swanland’ in the early hours of yesterday morning. Although some additional wreckage including a lifejacket and a lifering have been found, the missing seafarers have still not been located.

This morning’s search for the five seafarers began at 8.00 am and covered 105 miles of coastline from Holyhead to Aberdovey. Although that search is now complete, coastguards will carry out a short low water search from 3.00 pm until dusk.

Five lifeboats, six helicopters, four coastguard rescue teams, three merchant vessels, an Irish naval patrol vessel and a fixed wing aircraft searched an area of approximately 300 square miles yesterday. However, the only sign of the missing seafarers was their two liferafts, a lifebuoy from the vessel and a survival suit.

Holyhead Coastguard Watch Manager, Ray Carson says:
"Sadly we still have not been able to locate the missing seafarers. We will carry out one final search at low water today."

CREW MAN INJURED IN ATTEMPT TO TOW VESSEL FROM SAND IN TROON HARBOUR

A crew man was injured last night when a tow rope snapped during an attempt to pull the vessel ‘Norcape’ from the sand at the entrance to Troon Harbour.

Clyde Coastguard received a request for help at 10pm. A crew man had been injured on the legs when a tow rope snapped during an attempt to pull the ro-ro ferry from the sand. The vessel was only 200m from the shore and so the RNLI lifeboat from Troon was able to quickly transfer the crew man ashore for medical treatment.

The ‘Norcape’ was successfully pulled from the sand and is now at anchored two miles off Troon Harbour. At the time of the incident there were no passengers on board.

Clyde Coastguard Watch Manager Dan Sellers said:

“The reports are that the vessel didn’t suffer any damage during the grounding but MCA surveyors are aware.

“It isn’t appropriate for us to speculate as to the why the tow line snapped but using towing lines and mooring ropes are dangerous for anyone working on deck.”

 -Ends-


Sunday, 27 November 2011

SEARCH FOR MISSING SEAFARERS FINISHES

The search for the five merchant seafarers who are missing ten miles west of the Lleyn peninsula, Gwynedd has finished for this evening and will be reassessed at first light.
Four lifeboats, four helicopters, three coastguard rescue teams, two merchant vessels and a fixed wing aircraft have searched an area of approximately 300 square miles today. However, sadly the only sign of the missing seafarers has been their two liferafts, a lifebuoy from the vessel and a survival suit.
In the early hours of this morning two seafarers were airlifted from the sea and a third person was found, but sadly he was deceased.
The 81-metre cargo  carrier, ‘Swanland’  broadcast a mayday message at  2.00 am this morning. The ship reported that their hull was cracking, due to bad weather and that they thought that it may be taking water. Holyhead Coastguard broadcast a mayday relay and several vessels responded. Two of these vessels were able to go to the assistance of the Swanland and its eight crew. When the two vessels arrived at the scene, they found two liferafts and some floating debris. They were able to provide shelter from the gale force winds, whilst awaiting the arrival of rescue resources. Meanwhile Holyhead Coastguard had scrambled two rescue helicopters and requested the launch of two lifeboats.
When the helicopters arrived on scene they found two crew members in the water clinging to the liferafts. These two were airlifted from the sea into the RAF helicopter and taken to RAF Valley. A short while later a third person, who was deceased was found. The search is continued throughout the day for the other five with additional rescue resources being added as the day progressed
Holyhead Coastguard Watch Manager Mark Craddock says:
“Sadly, despite a 14-search involving land, sea and air assets, we have not been able to find any sign of the missing men. As darkness draws in we are releasing the rescue crews.”

SEARCH ONGOING FOR SEAFARERS MISSING IN GALE FORCE SEAS

Holyhead Coastguard is currently coordinating the search for six merchant seafarers who are missing in gale force weather 20 miles north west of the Lleyn peninsula, Gwynedd.
The 81-metre cargo  carrier, ‘Swanland’  broadcast a mayday message at  2.00 am this morning. The ship reported that their hull was cracking, due to bad weather and that they thought that it may be taking water. Holyhead coastguard broadcast a mayday relay and several vessels responded. Two of these vessels were able to go to the assistance of the Swanland and its eight crew. When the two vessels arrived at the scene, they found two liferafts and some floating debris. They were able to provide shelter from the gale force winds, whilst awaiting the arrival of rescue resources. Meanwhile Holyhead Coastguard had scrambled the two rescue helicopters from RAF Valley and Dublin Coastguard and requested the launch of the Preseli and Porth Dinllaen RNLI all weather lifeboats.
When the helicopters arrived on scene they found two crew members in the water clinging to the liferafts. These two were airlifted from the sea into the RAF helicopter and taken to RAF Valley. The search is continuing for the other six.
Holyhead Coastguard Watch Manager Jim Green says:
“We are very concerned for the safety of the other six crew members. We know that at least some of them are wearing immersion suits and have strobe lighting with them, however sea conditions are challenging at best.
The cargo vessel had 3000 tonnes of limestone onboard. It appears that it may have sunk.”

Saturday, 26 November 2011

DIVERS FOUND AFTER BEING CARRIED AWAY IN STRONG TIDES

At 11.00 am this morning the dive boat ‘Skindeeper’ reported to Portland Coastguard that it had two divers who were missing off Grove Point after completing their dive.

The divers were part of a larger group making a drift dive off Portland. The other divers were picked up at the end of the dive and it was then that the dive boat skipper realised that two were unaccounted for.

The local boats ‘Tiger Lily’, ‘Meerkat’ and ‘Sabre’ responded to Portland Coastguard’s urgency broadcast and began searching for the missing men. Weymouth Inshore and All Weather RNLI Lifeboats were launched and the Coastguard helicopter from Portland was scrambled.
The divers were spotted 1.5 nautical miles south west of Portland, having been carried  4.5 miles in approximately an hour by the strong tides along the east side of Portland.

They were recovered to shore by the helicopter, safe and well.

Portland Coastguard Duty Watch Manager Nic Lonsdale says:

“When the spring tides are running fast every second counts. These divers were very lucky.  Dive boat skippers should always contact HM Coastguard as soon as something starts to go wrong.”

Friday, 25 November 2011

INTERNATIONAL COORDINATION ASSURES RESCUE OF FRENCH FISHERMAN

A call from a French fishing vessel to request the medical evacuation of a crew member became more complicated than usual because no-one on board spoke English.


At 9.45am Belfast Coastguard received the report of a man with abdominal pains from the fishing vessel ‘Saint Gothard’ south east of Strangford Lough. The skipper had spoken to a doctor who had advised
that the 50 year old man should be taken to hospital as soon as possible.


It quickly became apparent that the crew did not speak English and so the French Coastguard from Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre in Gris Nez agreed to translate. Using three-way communications, which included satellite telephones and coastguard equipment, Belfast Coastguard, the crew of the Irish helicopter and the Coastguard at Gris Nez managed to communicate with the vessel, explaining how to set-up a high-line transfer and the best direction and speed of the vessel for the winchman. The sick crew man was successfully airlifted, by the Irish Coastguard helicopter in Gale force 8 winds and taken to hospital in Newry, Northern Ireland.


Belfast Coastguard, Watch Manager Steve Carson said:
"I’d like to thank our colleagues in Ireland and France for their help with this rescue, which ensured that a sick fisherman now has the medical attention he needs. "

Tuesday, 22 November 2011

Coastguard modernisation proposals confirmed

Plans to modernise the Coastguard have been confirmed by Shipping Minister Mike Penning. The proposals, which were announced for consultation in July, will make the Coastguard better coordinated, more resilient to the challenges of the future and will increase the number of regular coastguard officers working in coastal communities, who provide leadership and support to the volunteers of the Coastguard Rescue Service.
The plans - which will modernise how rescues are coordinated and do not affect the services which go out to perform rescues -will create a nationally networked system of Coastguard coordination centres comprising:
  • one Maritime Operations Centre, to be established in Fareham, Hants, with a back-up facility at the existing Dover coordination centre, both operating on a 24 hour basis; and
  • eight Coastguard Centres, all operated on a 24 hour basis, located at Falmouth, Milford Haven, Holyhead, Belfast, Stornoway, Shetland, Aberdeen and Humber. The station at London is also retained.
Mike Penning said:
“After many years of uncertainty, these reforms provide a clear plan for the future of Her Majesty’s Coastguard. They will deliver a resilient and fully networked national rescue coordination service. They will make much better use of the talents and skills of our Coastguards and will provide more interesting and rewarding work with better pay.
“The UK coastguard has a great heritage. This is a blueprint for a 21st century Coastguard that commands even greater respect and it will provide an organisation of which coastguards themselves and all of us can be justly proud.”
Under the plans the Coastguard co-ordination centres at Forth, Clyde, Great Yarmouth, Liverpool, Thames, Swansea, Brixham and Portland will close progressively by 31 March 2015. The centre at Solent will be replaced by the new Maritime Operations Centre.

While a rescue coordination function will no longer be required in these locations, new coastal operational hubs - providing better leadership, support and training for the volunteers of the Coastguard Rescue Service - will be established at the existing sites at Liverpool, Swansea and Thames, as well as in the Clyde area, and through the further development of the MCA’s site at the former HMS Daedalus at Lee-on-Solent.

The new Maritime Operations Centre will be housed in a purpose built emergency services centre at the vacant Fire Control Centre building at Fareham. The building’s existing facilities mean that the Maritime Operations Centre can be established quickly.

How Coastguard rescues are co-ordinated has changed little over the past forty years. Currently, operations are coordinated from 19 dispersed centres with no network of national integration. This means that there is very limited resilience in the event of high demand or technical problems and it is impossible to spread the workload evenly across the system, leaving staff in one centre struggling to cope with call volumes while workloads in another may be low. The plans confirmed today will create a resilient and nationally networked system of Coastguard coordination centres as well as giving Coastguards more opportunity to develop and apply their skills, offering increased responsibility, a recognised career path and the remuneration to reflect this.

Notes to editors

  1. The blueprint for the future of HM Coastguard is available on the Maritime and Coastguard Agency website
  2. The Government first launched a consultation on Coastguard modernisation in December 2010. The Government then published updated proposals for consultation in July 2011. The first set of proposals had proposed establishing two Maritime Operations Centres (in the Southampton/Portsmouth area & Aberdeen) and five sub-centres, operating in daylight hours only, as well as retaining the 24 hour centre at Dover which oversees English Channel activity.
  3. There were a total of over 1,800 responses to the consultation launched in December 2011. These reflected a general acceptance that change and modernisation is necessary, but also expressed concerns over a potential loss of local knowledge and a perceived weakening of operational relationships. The second consultation, on the revised proposals launched in July 2011, has attracted 800 responses.
  4. Compared to the consultation launched in December 2010 the plans confirmed today keep more centres open, all operating for 24 hours, and retain more coastguard jobs. At least one coastguard centre in each of the existing operational 'pairs' - where work and local intelligence is already regularly shared - will be retained.
  5. That second consultation exercise invited views on four specific issues: the case for a single Maritime Operations Centre; keeping both the centres at Stornoway and on Shetland; whether there were factors to support the retention of Liverpool rather than its paired centre at Holyhead; and whether there were factors to support the retention of Swansea rather than its paired centre at Milford Haven.

UNCONSCIOUS MAN RESCUED FROM INCOMING TIDE

A lucky man was rescued from the estuarial mud at Penryndaedraeth this afternoon after he was found unconscious in the mud, with the tide coming in.

He had been found lying in a muddy ditch in 10 inches of water by a man and his dog. Jumping in to hold his head above the rising water his rescuer managed to attract the attention of some builders working nearby. They called the ambulance, who alerted Holyhead Coastguard.

The RAF Rescue helicopter from Valley was sent to the scene with Criccieth Coastguard Rescue Team and paramedics. The man was rescued from the ditch and taken to hospital by helicopter.

Holyhead Coastguard Watch Manager Barry Priddis said:
“This gentleman was really lucky to be found as the tide was coming in and he would soon have been beneath the water. If I was him I’d buy a lottery ticket tonight.”

 -Ends-

Notes to Editors

  1. Follow us on Twitter. Find us at MCA_media
  2. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

FISHING VESSEL RUNS AGROUND AT ENTRANCE TO ARDGLASS HARBOUR

The crew of a fishing vessel were rescued from a life raft last night after their fishing vessel ‘Moyuna’ ran aground at the entrance to Ardglass Harbour.

The 15 metre vessel was returning from a fishing trip when it hit the rocks. With the vessel listing at 30 degrees they broadcast a mayday alert on Channel 16 before the four crew took to the life raft. They were rescued from there by another fishing vessel ‘The Three Coins’.

All four crew were brought ashore at Ardglass Harbour safe and well where the South Down Coastguard Rescue Team met them. The damage to the ‘Moyuna’ is now being assessed.

Belfast Coastguard Watch Manager Alan Pritchard said:
“The crew did exactly the right thing in calling for assistance and taking to the life raft to wait for help to reach them.

“The MAIB have been informed and they will be investigating the circumstances that led to tonight’s grounding. MCA’s surveyors are also aware.”

 -Ends-

Notes to Editors

Follow us on Twitter. Find us at MCA_media

Saturday, 19 November 2011

SEARCH UNDERTAKEN AFTER EQUIPMENT FOUND

At 04.20 pm yesterday, a report was received that a kite surfer`s gear had been found adrift in Poole Harbour. Poole Coastguard Rescue Team were called out and the Coastguard Rescue Helicopter based at Portland was scrambled. The Poole Sector Manager also proceeded and the Poole RNLI inshore lifeboat was requested to launch.
A search of the south east corner of Poole Harbour was undertaken both of the sea and the shoreline. Dorset Police also joined the search and assisted with enquiries at local residences.

The board is a white, orange and brown 'Brunotti' measuring 1360 by 400mm. The kite is a red and black 'Cabrinha Convert 11'. Despite the search and enquiries, no kite surfer was located.

The search was stood down at 08.10 pm, local radio stations are continuing to make broadcasts for the owner or anyone with information to come forward.
Anybody with information or anyone who recognises the kitesurfing equipment, can they please call Portland Coastguard on 01305 760439.

Friday, 18 November 2011

HOVERTRAVEL OPERATIONS SUSPENDED

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency has suspended Hovertravel’s ISM Document of Compliance which allows them to operate. The effect of this is that their hovercraft ‘Freedom 90’ and ‘Island Express’ cannot operate.

We have taken this action because of safety concerns following an investigation into a propeller failure that occurred on a third craft which highlighted inconsistencies in their safety management systems, particularly with vessel maintenance.

Richard Pellew, Maritime and Coastguard Agency Area Operations Manager for the South East said:
“We are working closely with Hovertravel and the propeller manufacturers to investigate the circumstances around the propeller failure.

“Hovertravel’s management team has responded positively to our concerns and we will be working with them over the weekend to resolve the issues so these hovercraft can return to service as soon as possible".

-Ends-
 Notes to Editors

  1. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

  1. Follow us on Twitter. Find us at MCA_media

Thursday, 17 November 2011

YACHT HITS PLYMOUTH BREAKWATER


A yachtsman has been rescued after his yacht hit the Plymouth breakwater this evening.

Brixham Coastguard received a Mayday broadcast from a yachtsman aboard a 26ft yacht, at .  Tamar Coastguard Rescue Team were sent to the scene and the Plymouth RNLI inshore and all weather lifeboats were requested to launch.  Also on scene was the MOD police launch.

Andy Huber, Watch Manager, Brixham Coastguard, says:

“The sole yachtsman was sailing his boat from Dartmouth to Wales and took shelter at Plymouth due to the worsening weather conditions on scene of south westerlies force 5 – 6 gusting 7.  The yacht hit the eastern end breakwater but managed to re-float but then hit the western end and went firmly aground.  The yachtsman was then able to step off the boat onto the breakwater where he was rescued by the lifeboat crew who guided him to a safer area to embark on the lifeboat. He was then taken to Plymouth lifeboat station.  The yacht is still firmly aground.”

We recommend boat users to join the coastguard’s Voluntary Safety Identification Scheme CG66. If you then get into difficulty the coastguard will have information that may assist in your search and rescue.  The scheme is free and is for the benefit of the owners and skippers of all types of leisure vessels and small craft. For more information visit www.dft.gov.uk/mca or contact your local coastguard station.


Notes to Editors:

  • Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch
                                                                                                                     
  • Follow us on Twitter. We can be found at  MCA_media

  • The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities  http://www.seavisionuk.org/

                                                                          

For further details contact:
The Maritime & Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
Office hours: 023 8032 9401
Mobile: 07764 624 505
Press releases and further information about the Agency is available on the Web at www.mcga.gov.uk

Sunday, 13 November 2011

ANGLER RESCUED I N CORNWALL

At Falmouth Coastguard received a 999 call from an angler reporting that a “freak wave” had washed anglers off rocks and into the sea at Rinsey Head near Porthleven.

Falmouth Coastguard sent the rescue helicopter R193 from RNAS Culdrose and the RNLI all weather and inshore lifeboats from Penlee as well as Porthleven Coastguard Rescue Team. 

The rescue helicopter crew located the man who was still conscious after he had spent 20 minutes in the water.  He was winched into the helicopter and transferred to Royal Cornwall Hospital, Treliske. 

The man is in his late 40’s and from the Leedstown area. 

Falmouth Coastguard Watch Manager Andy Condy says,

“This angler was very fortunate to be found in the water after dark and in rough seas.  He was not wearing a lifejacket and so he was extremely lucky to have managed to stay afloat long enough to be spotted by rescuers.  HM Coastguard recommends anglers can stay safe by wearing a life jacket.”



-Ends-
 Notes to Editors

  1. The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities.  Sea Vision promotes the importance and economic value of the sector and works to highlight the exciting range of activities and career opportunities available to young people within the UK growing maritime sector. www.seavisionuk.org

  1. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

  1. Follow us on Twitter. Find us at MCA_media

CHILD RECOVERED FROM WATER AT KIRCALDY

At on Saturday, Forth Coastguard received a 999 call reporting that a child was in the water off the Kircaldy Esplanade.

Kinghorn RNLI Lifeboat and Kinghorn Coastguard Rescue Team were on scene by and the lifeboat crew recovered a young child from the water in a strong swell. 

The lifeboat crew gave emergency medical attention and transferred the child in a serious condition to a waiting ambulance in Kircaldy Harbour.

Sadly the three year old boy was later pronounced deceased at Victoria Hospital.

Tuesday, 8 November 2011

OVERHEARD MAYDAY PROMPTS SOLO SAILOR RESCUE

A spoken word distress call overheard by crew on board an offshore installation and passed to Yarmouth Coastguard led to the rescue of a Dutch sailor earlier this evening.

At 4.42 pm, Yarmouth Coastguard were contacted by crew on board the offshore installation ‘Energy Enhancer’, who had heard a brief Mayday call from a man on board a yacht that was possibly on fire approximately 40 miles east of Cromer in Norfolk.  The standby vessel ‘Highland Champion’ was en route to investigate, and Yarmouth Coastguard also requested the launch of the Cromer RNLI Lifeboat and sent the Rescue Helicopter from RAF Wattisham to the scene.  The offshore patrol vessel, HMS Mersey, was also in the area and sent her fast rescue boat, which arrived on scene first and located the single handed sailor, who had abandoned his yacht for his liferaft. 

The rescue helicopter met up with HMS Mersey 35 miles out to sea and collected the sailor and brought him ashore.  The yacht subsequently burnt out and sank.

Peter Wheeler, Yarmouth Coastguard Watch Manager said:

“The sailor involved reacted very quickly to what was an incredibly dangerous and life-threatening situation, and was very fortunate that his cry for help was overheard and that there were vessels in the area able to assist so quickly.  If it had been necessary to launch a large scale search for the man we may well have had a different outcome.”

FISHING VESSEL SKIPPER PLEADS GUILTY

The skipper of Grimsby based fishing vessel ‘Karen’, that grounded on rocks at Ardglass, has pleaded guilty to the charge of endangering his ship and crew.

On 3rd January 2011 the UK registered fishing vessel ‘Karen’ was returning from a day’s fishing in the Irish Sea when it grounded on the rocks at the North entrance to the port of Ardglass.

The vessel asked for urgent assistance from the Coastguard and the lifeboat from Portaferry was requested to launch to their aid. Because the weather was fair they were able to bring the crew ashore to Ardglass and to put pumps aboard the stricken vessel. The boat was later re-floated as the tide rose, however it sustained serious damage to the bow and keel.

At the Magistrate’s Court in Downpatrick on 7th November 2011, skipper Simon Wills pleaded guilty of failing to properly navigate his vessel and to employing crew who were not qualified and did not meet the requirements of the fishing vessel safety training regulations

Mr Wills was fined a total of £600 and ordered to pay £1,250 to the RNLI.

On summing up the Magistrate Brian Archer said,
“It was fortunate that no one was injured.”

Captain Bill Bennett, Area Operations Manager (Survey and Inspection) Belfast, for the MCA stated that

“This was a serious breach of the fishing vessel safety training regulations and once again reminds all fishermen of the need to ensure everyone onboard is properly qualified and to safely navigate his vessel and to maintain a lookout at all times.  All breaches of the Maritime Regulations are taken seriously by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency.”

Ends-

Notes to Editors

  1. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

  1. Follow us on Twitter. Find us at MCA_media

Sunday, 6 November 2011

TWO MEN CLING TO UPTURNED BOAT EAST OF SHETLAND

Two men have been rescued from an upturned boat this afternoon, east of Shetland.

At Shetland Coastguard were informed initially by the Northern Constabulary, at Inverness of a maritime incident, but information was sparse. They referred to person(s) clinging to an upturned boat east of Shetland. Fortunately a second ‘999’ call came in, direct to the Coastguard from a member of the public who had spoken with the crew of the upturned boat, this call gave a clearer picture of the circumstances and the location of the two men. The coastguard was then able to request the launch of the Lerwick RNLI lifeboat and request help from vessels in the area. Coastguard Rescue Officers from Sullom Voe were also requested to attend the area.

Alex Wylie, Watch Manager, Shetland Coastguard, says:

“The ferry ‘Daggri’ operating from the Island of Yell was able to deploy its fast rescue craft which quickly located the two men in the water clinging to their upturned boat. In addition the ferry ‘Dagalien’ assisted by deploying their rescue craft to tow the upturned boat to the shore. The lifeboat was stood down. The two men were taken from the sea and a third man was retrieved from the Island of Bigga; they were all taken to Toft in Shetland where they were met by Sullom Voe Coastguard Team, and an ambulance who could better assess whether medical attention was necessary.

We would like to remind the public if they know of or witness an incident on or around the coast to not call 999 and ask for the coastguard. You can do this even if you have no credit on your phone or if the phone is locked. Tell the coastguard what the problem is and give as much information as you can. You may need to stay on the line to direct them to the scene. 
If you are out in your boat always tell someone where you are going and what time you expect to return and remember to update them if your plans change.  
We recommend boat users to join the coastguard’s Voluntary Safety Identification Scheme CG66. If you then get into difficulty the coastguard will have information that may assist in your search and rescue.  The scheme is free and is for the benefit of the owners and skippers of all types of leisure vessels and small craft. For more information visit www.dft.gov.uk/mca or contact your local coastguard station.”


Notes to Editors:

  • Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch
                                                                                                                     
  • Follow us on Twitter. We can be found at  MCA_media

  • The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities  http://www.seavisionuk.org/

                                                                          

For further details contact:
The Maritime & Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
Office hours: 023 8032 9401
Mobile: 07764 624 505
Press releases and further information about the Agency is available on the Web at www.mcga.gov.uk

Saturday, 5 November 2011

TWO TEENAGE GIRLS CUT OFF BY TIDE AT WHITBY


Two teenage girls have been rescued this afternoon by the coastguard, after getting cut off by the tide at Whitby.

Humber Coastguard received a ‘999’ call from one of the girls mobile phones requesting help. The girls both aged 13, were on west side of Whitby Pier when they found themselves cut off and had started to climb 30 foot up a 75 foot cliff.

Coastguard Rescue Officers from Whitby and Staithes were sent to the scene and the Whitby inshore RNLI lifeboat was requested to launch. 

Graham Dawson, Watch Manager, Humber Coastguard, says:

“We were able to stay in contact with the girls until the coastguard rescue officers were on scene. The girls have since been assisted to the top of the cliff.  The girls are cold and shaken by their ordeal and looking forward to being reunited with their family. 

We would like to remind the public not to attempt to climb up or down cliffs unless you are properly equipped and trained to do so. Do not attempt to climb cliffs as a short cut back to the top. Do not attempt self rescue. If you get into difficulty, call 999 and ask for the coastguard. “




Notes to Editors:

  • Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch
                                                                                                                     
  • Follow us on Twitter. We can be found at  MCA_media

  • The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities  http://www.seavisionuk.org/

                                                                          

For further details contact:
The Maritime & Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
Office hours: 023 8032 9401
Mobile: 07764 624 505
Press releases and further information about the Agency is available on the Web at www.mcga.gov.uk

Wednesday, 2 November 2011

INJURED MAN EVACUATED FROM YACHT IN CHALLENGING WEATHER CONDITIONS

At 10.50 pm yesterday, Portland Coastguard received a radio message from the eight metre yacht ‘Skean Dhu’ which was passing thirteen miles south of Portland Bill while on passage to Dartmouth. She reported that one of the two crew aboard had fallen heavily and suffered a head and possible spinal injury.

The Coastguard rescue helicopter from Lee-on-Solent was scrambled and Weymouth RNLI  all weather lifeboat, with a doctor onboard, was launched. In addition the Royal Navy frigate HMS Portland which was exercising close by offered her assistance. In worsening weather conditions (strong winds, gusting to gale force) the doctor and a crewman from the lifeboat were transferred to the Skean Dhu. The helicopter winchman was lowered to HMS Portland’s sea boat and was also transferred to the yacht. The 63-year-old man was prepared for winching into the helicopter before being flown to Southampton General Hospital. Meanwhile, due to the worsening weather conditions, the doctor and lifeboat crewman remained on the now single-handed yacht while she was escorted by the lifeboat across Lyme Bay towards Brixham.

The escort was taken over by Torbay RNLI lifeboat at 3.30 am and Weymouth Lifeboat returned. The yacht and lifeboat arrived at Brixham at about 6.00 am.

Steve Williams Portland Coastguard Watch Manager says:

“This was a challenging evacuation of a man with suspected severe injuries. Weather conditions meant that it was important that the crews on scene were able to use HMS Portland’s seaboat for assistance. The injured man has arrived in hospital and is receiving medical attention.”