Saturday, 30 April 2011

SEARCH UNDERWAY FOR MISSING PERSON ON LOCH ETIVE



A search is underway for a missing person after a small boat capsized on Loch Etive, North of Oban.

Clyde Coastguard received information regarding the incident at from the Northern Constabulary. It is believed that there were five people fishing on the small open boat on Loch Etive.  The boat capsized and four of the five occupants managed to make their way to the shoreline where the alarm was raised. 

Coastguard Rescue officers from Oban and Appin are carrying out a shore line search, with the assistance of the Coastguard vessel ‘Hawk’. The launch of the Oban RNLI lifeboat was also requested and the RAF Rescue helicopter has been scrambled as well as the Stratchclyde Police helicopter. Mountain Rescue team are on scene as well as Police from the Northern Constabulary.

 Tarik Yassen, Watch Manger, Clyde Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre, said:

"The search is currently ongoing; it will of course have to be suspended over the hours of darkness but will be resumed as soon as daylight is resumed tomorrow.




For further details contact:
The Maritime & Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
Office hours: 023 8032 9401
Mobile: 07764 624 505
Press releases and further information about the Agency is available on the Web at www.mcga.gov.uk

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TWO BOYS RESCUED AFTER JUMPING FROM HARBOUR WALL

Two boys have been rescued this afternoon after getting into difficulty after jumping from Bridlington Harbour wall.

Bridlington Harbour Authority contacted Humber Coastguard when two boys were seen jumping off the harbour wall (10 – 15 foot drop); they were then unable to get back to the steps due to the harsh sea conditions.

Humber Coastguard sent Coastguard Rescue Officers from Bridlington to the scene and requested the launch of the RNLI Bridlington inshore lifeboat.  Humberside Police and Yorkshire Ambulance were also requested to attend.

Lynda Bell - Watch Officer, Humber Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre, said:
 
"The boys were unable to get back to the steps to safety with the weather conditions on scene being easterly winds gusting to 26 knots with strong spray and surf it made the rescue of the boys from the lifeboat very difficult.

I am pleased to say the boys are now safe and well but this incident could easily have developed into something far more serious.

Jumping from harbour walls or piers, often known as ‘tombstoning’ can be dangerous because:
·         Water depth alters with the tide; the water may be shallower than it seems.
·         Submerged objects like rocks may not be visible; they can cause serious injury if you jump onto them.
·         The shock of cold water may make it difficult to swim.
·         Strong currents can rapidly sweep people away.

Since 2005 there have been 10 deaths and 36 serious injuries due to ‘tombstoning’.”

Notes to editors:
Listen to our tombstoner radio filler:
http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mcga07-home/leisurenandtheseaside/mcga-coastbeach/tombstoning.htm




For further details contact:
The Maritime & Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
Office hours: 023 8032 9401
Mobile: 07764 624 505
Press releases and further information about the Agency is available on the Web at www.mcga.gov.uk

TWO RESCUED FROM YACHT - OFF ISLE OF JURA


A man and woman aboard a 21 foot sailing yacht have been rescued this morning West off the Isle of Jura.

At
, one of the crew aboard the yacht made an emergency ‘999’ mobile phone call to the Coastguard requesting assistance. The crew had lost their forward hatch and was experiencing strong winds and rough seas, which necessitated bailing water out of the forward cabin. The yacht was north of the entrance to Loch Tarbert.

Clyde Coastguard immediately issued a Mayday Relay to all vessels in the area and requested the launch of the Islay RNLI lifeboat. The Rescue helicopter from RNAS Gannet at
Prestwick was scrambled to the scene.

Irene Reid, Watch Officer at Clyde Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre, said:

"We were very fortunate to receive their mobile phone call as communications in this area are notoriously difficult. As a result of the Mayday Relay broadcast, a Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat ‘Red Bay 10’ which was at a nearby Regatta was able to offer assistance and soon located the casualties and took them aboard their RHIB.  The Rescue helicopter was soon on scene and stood by the casualty vessel. When the lifeboat arrived it took the two casualties aboard and attached a tow line to the yacht, which is now under tow to Port Askaig on the
Island of Islay.

We would like to remind boat users to always ensure they are properly prepared when going out in their boat and to monitor the weather and not get caught out. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket and keep in touch.”


For more guidance on keeping safe at the coast visit http://www.mcga.gov.uk/.



For further details contact:
The Maritime & Coastguard Agency Duty Press Officer
Office hours: 023 8032 9401
Mobile: 07764 624 505
Press releases and further information about the Agency is available on the Web at www.mcga.gov.uk

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Friday, 29 April 2011

TEN MEN IN A BOAT RESCUED

Press release: 115-11                                                                  29 April 2011
At 1.40 pm Forth Coastguard received a 999 call reporting a motor boat broken down and three people in the water.

The small motor boat had broken down and some of the party had entered the water. The motor boat had been launched at Port Edgar and had ten people onboard.

Queensferry and Kinghorn Coastguard teams were called and Queensferry RNLI Inshore Lifeboat was requested to launch, Scottish Ambulance and Granton Sector Manager were also called. The three men were recovered from the water by the lifeboat and the vessel towed into Dalgety Bay, everyone was recovered ashore and two men were taken by ambulance to hospital suffering from mild hypothermia.

Following that incident Forth Coastguard received a further 999 call reporting peddle craft with 3 persons on board in difficulty just outside Elie harbour.

Anstruther RNLI All Weather Lifeboat and Leven Coastguard Rescue Team were already at Elie dealing with another incident. The lifeboat recovered the individuals and towed the peddle craft ashore where Leven Coastguard Team were there to meet them.

Simon Ward, Watch Officer, Forth Coastguard said:

Small leisure vessels come with a carrying capacity as recommended by the manufacturer, which should not be exceeded. With ten people onboard this small sports boat it was dangerously overloaded.

In the second incident, taking a water craft without consent is an offence, and pedalos are for fun in a designated area.

Both of these incidents could have ended in different ways, had it not been for the callers ashore who spotted these people in difficulty.  If you see someone in trouble at the coast or at sea, dial 999 and ask for the Coastguard.

Thursday, 28 April 2011

LONDON COASTGUARD COORDINATE SEARCH ON THE RIVER THAMES FOR MISSING SWIMMER

Press Notice No: 114-11                                                                    28 April, 2011

At 05.35 pm today, London Coastguard received multiple 999 calls from members of the public reporting a man attempting to swim across the River Thames from Kingston.
The man reported that the swimmer whilst part way across disappeared below the surface. A man from a passing vessel entered the water to try and locate the swimmer but had to get back onto his vessel after being unsuccessful.
London Coastguard requested the launch of both Teddington RNLI lifeboats, the Met Police and London Ambulance services were also in attendance. London Fire Brigade mobilized their fireboat Fireflash, six fire appliances, three fire and rescue units which deployed two rescue boats and a command unit. The police helicopter India 99 also conducted a search from the air.
The search has now been stood down with no trace of the swimmer.
Matt Leat, London Coastguard Operator said:
Swimming across the River Thames can be extremely hazardous. It is a very busy waterway and has a strong tidal flow. The water temperature is about 10 degrees C, and the effects of cold water immersion can soon take effect.
If you see someone in trouble dial 999 and ask for the Coastguard.

BOY RESCUED OFF CLIFFS BY COASTGUARD RESCUE TEAMS

Press Notice No: 113-11                                                                    28 April, 2011
Sector Manager Barry Scott being lowered down the cliff to rescue boy.

At 14.12 pm, Milford Haven coastguard received a 999 call from the father of a 12 year old boy, reporting that his son was stuck up a cliff and on a safe ledge out of danger but  scared. The boy was 25 metres up from the bottom, he had found it easy to get up but not to get down.
Milford Haven called out the Dale and Broadhaven Coastguard rescue teams and the South Pembrokeshire and Preselli Sector Managers were called out.

His son was away collecting treasures, bit of wood, nets etc and saw old rope up the cliff  at a height 25 metres, he decided to climb up to it, got half way up gully when he realised he couldn`t get down, so he made his way to the top of a gully to a ledge where he rested and wait for assistance.
The team lowered a cliffman to the boy and they were then lowered to the beach. He was uninjured except for grazes to lower legs. They were on holiday in the area from Shropshire.

Edward Perkins, Watch Officer, Milford Haven Coastguard said:
Although, it may look simple and easy, cliffs can present challenging conditions.  This parent did exactly the right thing in calling for expert help from the Coastguard. Our teams are fully trained and equipped for such rescue procedures.
If you see someone in trouble dial 999 and ask for the Coastguard.

TWO CLIMBERS LOCATED AND RESCUED AFTER BEING REPORTED MISSING

Press release: 112-11                                                                  28 April 2011


At 22.15pm MRCC Falmouth received a 999 call from a member of a climbing group at Bosigran in North West Cornwall.

The caller reported that two of their group had last been seen at 1100 in the morning when they had gone to climb in the Great Zawn area. The group were all due to meet up again at 20.30 pm but these two had not returned.

The St Ives and Lands End Coastguard rescue teams were called out, St Ives RNLI All Weather Lifeboat and Inshore Lifeboat were requested to launch and Rescue Helicopter R193 was scrambled.

As the teams and the lifeboats were commencing their search R193 located the two climbers at the base of the cliffs at a climb called Xanadu. In order to winch the climbers from their position, the helicopter R193 had to manoeuvre right in under the cliffs even disappearing from the view of Coastguards on the cliff top.

The two climbers were winched to R193 where it was confirmed that they did not require any medical treatment. They were then put back onto the ground into the care of the Coastguard teams and their climbing party. The climbers had been climbing all day when they realised that they were still at the bottom of a big climb when they ran out of light.

They decided that it was too dangerous to climb out in the dark so they sat tight and waited for someone to come to their aid. They had mobile phones but these had been left in their rucksacks at the top of the cliff. Bosigran is a very popular climbing area with some very difficult climbs.

Terry Collins, Watch Manager, Falmouth Coastguard said:

This incident shows that even experienced climbers can get into difficulties, but they had the sense to stay in their safe position and wait for help to come to them rather than risk climbing out in the dark.

Wednesday, 27 April 2011

MAN AND SON RESCUED

Press Notice No:  111-11                                                                       27 April, 2011

At 15.05 pm, Humber Coastguard received a call from North Yorkshire police after a lady walked into the Filey police station to report that her husband and 14 yr old son were cut off by the tide.
The son had attempted to climb to safety and was part way up the cliff. His father was stuck on rocks with his collie dog.
Humber Coastguard called out the Filey Coastguard rescue team, requested the launch of the Filey RNLI inshore lifeboat and scrambled a helicopter.
All three were winched to a place of safety on top of the cliff by the helicopter, where they were met by waiting coastguard rescue officers who transported them to meet up with mother and wife.
Graham Dawson, Watch Manager, Humber Coastguard said:
Always remember to check tide times when going to the beach. Know your surroundings, and seek local advice.
If you see anyone in trouble at the sea or on the coast dial 999 and ask for the Coastguard.

Monday, 25 April 2011

CONCERN FOR OVERDUE YACHTSMAN


Press Notice No: 110-11                                                          25 April, 2011
At 06.37 pm, Swansea Coastguard was alerted by the skipper of a yacht called Portessa. The skipper expressed some concern of his fellow yachtsman who had not arrived at the Marina. The overdue vessel is called Summersalt.
The skipper of the Portessa reported that he lost sight of him in mist at 12:00, the Summersalt was making an estimated 4.5 knots and was approx 7 miles offshore. He has a small outboard on his yacht but that had suffered with engine problems. There is one man onboard whose age is over sixty.
Swansea Coastguard has been using several units to search for this man and his yacht as there is concern for his wellbeing. Coastguard rescue teams from Penarth, Ilfracombe, Watchet, Barry were called out
RNLI lifeboats from Porthcawl and Barry Dock have also been involved in the search and R169 was also scrambled. South Wales police were also informed.
Dai Jones, Watch Manager, Swansea Coastguard said:
We would like to emphasise the importance of communicating with the Coastguard and letting us know your passage plan.  We searched for this man and his yacht after receiving a call from his concerned colleague.
What we were unable to do was to communicate with him to ascertain his whereabouts due to the fact that he either had his radio turned off or it was not working. We were informed that he had VHF onboard. His mobile phone was also switched off.
Although we are pleased that he has turned up on a mooring 45 miles from his original destination, it is important that you communicate with the Coastguard and your fellow sailors to prevent incidents such as this.  Remember to register your vessel on CG66, our small yacht and boat safety scheme.

Saturday, 23 April 2011

KAYAKERS RESCUED IN NORTHERN IRELAND

Press release: 109-11                                                                  23 April 2011

At 13.05 pm, Belfast Coastguard received multiple 999 calls reporting a group of kayakers in difficulty.

The callers stated that they could see a group of twelve kayakers in difficulty off Portballintrae, Causeway Coast, Northern Ireland.

Belfast Coastguard called out the Coleraine Coastguard Rescue Team and requested the launch of the Portrush RNLI lifeboats.

On arrival the Coleraine Coastguard Rescue team kept the kayakers under observation and directed the Portrush RNLI inshore lifeboat to the Kayakers. It was quickly established some of the group had become exhausted and suffering from sea sickness. Eleven of the group where transferred onto the large all weather Portrush Lifeboat whilst the Inshore Lifeboat escorted the one remaining kayaker back to Portballintrae Harbour.

The Portrush Lifeboat then transferred the eleven rescued kayakers who were mainly teenagers to the safety of Portrush Harbour.

Luckily none of the group required any medical attention.

Steve Carson, Watch Manager, Belfast Coastguard said:

Whilst the sun is shining, the wind can make conditions tricky and unpredictable.  It is recommended that you contact us and let us know of your plans. It can help in incident situations.

If you see anyone in trouble at sea or on the coast, please call 999 and ask for the Coastguard.

Friday, 22 April 2011

DYLAN THE DOG HAS LUCKY ESCAPE AT DURDLE DOOR

Dylan the black Labrador had a lucky escape this morning when he fell over the cliff at Durdle Door.

At just after this morning Portland Coastguard received a 999 call from Dylan’s distressed owners who could just see him on a steep grassy slope five metres down the cliff.

Lulworth Coastguard Rescue Team was sent to rescue Dylan. They managed to bring him to the top of the cliff at just after , where he was happily re-united with his owners. Both Dylan and his owners were uninjured.

Jennet Chisholm Coastguard Watch Officer said:                    
“The common incidents we see are where dogs have slipped or bounded over a cliff edge because they haven’t anticipated the drop ahead. Owners will then risk their lives to rescue their dogs and our Coastguard Rescue Teams often get called out to help.

“In the UK last year alone there were 227 coastal accidents involving dogs that required emergency assistance from Coastguard’s Rescue Teams and just last month a dog died after falling over the same cliff.
 
"We would advise all dog owners to keep dogs on a lead when on cliff paths as a protective measure. It can be tempting to let your dog walk off lead especially if that’s what they are used to and they are well trained, but accidents like this on coastal walks are not uncommon - keeping your dog on a lead can protect both you and your pet.”
 
-Ends –


Notes to Editors

  1. The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities.  Sea Vision promotes the importance and economic value of the sector and works to highlight the exciting range of activities and career opportunities available to young people within the UK growing maritime sector. www.seavisionuk.org
                          
  1. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

  1. Follow us on Twitter. Find us at MCA_media

SEARCH CONTINUES FOR MISSING MAN AT HARTLAND POINT

The search for a man missing since yesterday evening re-started this morning at first light.

The missing man was last seen at yesterday heading for Life Rocks. The alarm was raised at just after when he failed to return.

Swansea Coastguard launched an extensive land and sea search from Speke’s Mill to Hartland Point using the Hartland Coastguard Rescue Team, the RNLI Inshore Lifeboat from Clovelly and RAF Rescue Helicopter 169 from Chivenor. Hartland Coastguard Rescue Team also searched the shoreline at low tide ( onwards) but found nothing. Westward Ho Coastguard Rescue Team, Clovelly RNLI Inshore Lifeboat and Appledore RNLI All Weather Lifeboat began searching again this morning.

The man they are looking for is in his mid thirties, 5’ 10” tall of a muscular build with short cropped dark brown hair. He was last seen wearing blue shorts and no shoes.

Steve Matthews, Coastguard Watch Manager said:
“We’ve carried out an extensive search of the cliffs, shoreline and sea and so far haven’t found the missing man. Because he’s fit and healthy we’re restarting the search this morning incase he’s trapped in the rocks or on the cliff face.

“If you’re in the area and see a man fitting this description please call 999 and ask for the Coastguard.”
                          
-Ends –


Notes to Editors

  1. The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities.  Sea Vision promotes the importance and economic value of the sector and works to highlight the exciting range of activities and career opportunities available to young people within the UK growing maritime sector. www.seavisionuk.org
                          
  1. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

  1. Follow us on Twitter. Find us at MCA_media


Thursday, 21 April 2011

DIVER MISSING OFF LYME REGIS

At just after this afternoon Portland Coastguard received a call from dive boat Blue Turtle, which was three nautical miles off Lyme Regis. They reported that a diver had failed to surface after a 20 metre dive. His buddy had made a rapid ascent and was recovered to the dive support vessel before being put on oxygen.

The cause of the incident is unclear at this time, however it is known that one diver made a rapid ascent and the other was last sighted below the surface of the sea.

The Coastguard Rescue helicopter from Portland was immediately sent to the scene to take the buddy of the missing diver back to the Poole hypobaric chamber for medical treatment. Sidmouth Independent Lifeboat, Lyme Regis and Weymouth RNLI Lifeboats and the Coastguard Rescue helicopter from Lee-on-Solent were sent to search for the missing diver whilst Poole Coastguard Rescue Team went to secure the helicopter landing site. The Lyme Regis Harbour Launch, the Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) Gold Rover and vessels Scrumpy and Bardsey Island also joined the search. Once the Lee-on-Solent Rescue Helicopter had completed their search, they were relieved by the Portland Coastguard Rescue Helicopter to continue the tasking.

Despite an extensive and lengthy search by multiple rescue units the missing diver has not been located and the search was suspended due to the onset of darkness at approximately 9.00pm.

Andrew Jenkins, Coastguard Watch Manager said:
“Although prompt search and rescue action has resulted in one diver receiving timely medical treatment at the specialist Hyperbaric Unit in Poole and is likely to make a full recovery, despite an extensive surface search of the area, the missing diver has not been located.

“At this stage, It would be wrong to speculate about the cause of this particular incident, but this is the second serious diving accident to have occurred off the Dorset coast already this season and I would like to take this opportunity to remind all divers to make sure they are well prepared, fully trained for the level of dive they are about to undertake and their equipment is properly maintained”.

-Ends –


Notes to Editors

  1. The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities.  Sea Vision promotes the importance and economic value of the sector and works to highlight the exciting range of activities and career opportunities available to young people within the UK growing maritime sector. www.seavisionuk.org
                          
  1. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

  1. Follow us on Twitter. Find us at MCA_media

Wednesday, 20 April 2011

VISIT TO FINGAL’S CAVE ALMOST ENDS IN DISASTER

A trip to Fingal’s Cave on Staffa almost ended in disaster this afternoon when five people found themselves in the water after the dinghy they were using to visit the caves sunk during its journey to the island.

Clyde Coastguard received a 999 call from one of the visitors at just before telling them that a dingy had sunk at the entrance to one of the caves on Staffa Island and five people were in the water. At the time of the call it was believed that one person was missing but they were subsequently accounted for.

Clyde Coastguard sent both the RNLI All Weather Lifeboat from Tobermory and Royal Navy rescue helicopter from HMS Gannet at Prestwick to the scene and broadcast an alert on Channel 16, which the vessels Island Lass and Iolaire of Iona responded to.

The group of five were reunited with the other seven members of their party on the Fingal’s Cave shore before being taken by helicopter to hospital in Oban. The rest of the party was taken by lifeboat to the Island of Iona.

Tarik Yassin, Coastguard Watch Manager said:
"This group was really lucky. They weren’t sucked into the cave by the rising tide and they had taken the essential precaution of wearing lifejackets.

"This day trip out from Loch Sunart obviously had an unexpected ending but no accident is expected. If you do find yourself in a similar situation you can improve your chances of survival by telling the Coastguard where you are going before you head out on the water, wearing a lifejacket and trying to keeping everyone in the group together until help arrives.”

-Ends –

For further information please contact:
Maritime and Coastguard Agency Press Office, on:
(023) 8032 9401

Notes to Editors

  1. The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities.  Sea Vision promotes the importance and economic value of the sector and works to highlight the exciting range of activities and career opportunities available to young people within the UK growing maritime sector. www.seavisionuk.org
                          
  1. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

  1. Follow us on Twitter. Find us at MCA_media


Tuesday, 19 April 2011

TWO BOYS RESCUED FROM INFLATABLE A MILE OFFSHORE

Two boys, aged seven and eight, were rescued from an inflatable boat a mile off Pwllheli this afternoon after the mother of one of the boys alerted the Coastguards at just before .

The strong offshore breeze had carried the inflatable a long way out to sea and the other mother swam out to try and rescue the boys. Although she did reach the inflatable she too then had to be rescued.

After receiving the 999 call Holyhead Coastguard sent the RNLI Pwllheli Inshore Lifeboat to the scene. They rescued the boys from the inflatable dingy and the woman plucked from the water. They were taken back to shore where they were met by Abersoch Coastguard Rescue Team and assessed by paramedics.

Barry Priddis, Coastguard Watch Manager said:
“Inflatables are fun but with a strong offshore wind, like we had today at Pwllheli, they can be swept out to sea very quickly. We were lucky today that the three people involved were all returned to shore safe and well and weren’t seriously injured.

“If you’re using an inflatable make sure it’s tethered to someone on the shore. If you do see one being carried out to sea tell those onboard to stay on the inflatable, dial 999 and ask for the Coastguard. Swimming out to sea can seem like the right thing to do but cold water and brisk tides can frequently mean that the rescuer also gets into difficulties. The best thing you can do is stay on the shore and keep the inflatable in sight so you can direct the lifeboat when it turns up on scene.”

-Ends –

For further information please contact:
Maritime and Coastguard Agency Press Office, on:
(023) 8032 9401

Notes to Editors

  1. The MCA is a partner in the Sea Vision UK campaign to raise awareness and understanding of the sea and maritime activities.  Sea Vision promotes the importance and economic value of the sector and works to highlight the exciting range of activities and career opportunities available to young people within the UK growing maritime sector. www.seavisionuk.org
                        
  1. Stay safe - before heading out on the water get trained, check weather and tides, wear a lifejacket, avoid alcohol and keep in touch

  1. Follow us on Twitter. Find us at MCA_media

19 crew evacuated from survey rig

At Humber Coastguard received a call from the standby vessel DUTCH PEARL, reporting that the jack-up rig VAGANT had stuck fast on the sea bed and was being swamped by the rising tide.  19 crew members from the rig were swiftly evacuated to the DUTCH PEARL and MRCC Humber took coordination of the incident.

Hartlepool RNLI all-weather lifeboat was launched to the scene and transferred 16 of the crew members to Teesport.  Coastguard Rescue Teams from Hartlepool and Redcar were alerted to assist with reception of the evacuated casualties ashore.  

Three rig crew members remain on the standby vessel Dutch Pearl and intend to return to the rig at low tide to attempt to free her from the seabed.  A full assessment of any pollution threat to the environment will be carried out at first light.

Watch Manager Drew Mahood said;
 “The initial evacuation was handled quickly and efficiently by the rig’s own standby vessel.  Without the swift action taken by the DUTCH PEARL, the rig crew would certainly have been faced with a life-threatening scenario.  As it is, most of them are now safely ashore and being looked after by their parent company.

“At this time we believe that there is no resultant pollution but we will continue to monitor the situation closely and act accordingly. “


-Ends-
 Notes to Editors

  1. The owners of the platform are based in Belgium, the Platform is carrying out surveys for a windfarm in Tees Bay.

  1. The multinational crew are Lithuanian, Irish, Dutch, Belgian, Portuguese and English

  1. Follow us on Twitter. Find us at MCA_media

Wednesday, 13 April 2011

4 FOREIGN SHIPS UNDER DETENTION IN THE UK DURING MARCH 2011

Press Notice No: 93 -11                                                                        13th April 2011


The Maritime & Coastguard Agency (MCA) announced today that 4 foreign flagged ships were under detention in UK ports during March 2011 after failing Port State Control (PSC) inspection.

Latest monthly figures show that there were no new detentions of foreign flagged ships in UK ports during March 2011 but 4 vessels remained under detention from previous months. The overall rate of detentions compared with inspections carried out over the last twelve months was 2.68% this is slightly down from February’s twelve month rate.

Out of the detained vessels none were registered with flag states listed on the Paris MOU white list, 1 was registered with a flag state on the grey list none were registered with flag states on the black list and 3 were unregistered.

1. In response to one of the recommendations of Lord Donaldson's Inquiry into the prevention of pollution from merchant shipping and in compliance with the EU Directive on Port State Control (95/21/EC as amended), the Maritime and Coastguard agency (MCA) publishes full details of the foreign flagged vessels detained in UK ports each month.

2. Inspections of foreign flagged ships in UK ports are undertaken by surveyors from the MCA. Where a ship is found to be deficient or lacks the required documentation, MCA surveyors can take a range of actions leading to detention in serious cases. The UK is part of a regional agreement on port state control known as the Paris Memorandum of Understanding on Port State Control (Paris MOU) and information on all ships that are inspected is held centrally in an electronic database known as Thetis. This allows the ships of flags with poor detention records to be targeted for future inspection.

3. Detained ships have to satisfy surveyors that remedial work has been carried out before they are allowed to leave port.

4. When applicable the list includes those passenger craft prevented from operating under the provisions of the EU Directive on Mandatory Surveys for the safe operation of regular Ro-Ro ferry and high speed passenger craft services (1999/35/EU).

Notes on the list of detentions

·         Full details of the ship.

·         The accompanying detention list shows ship’s name, the flag state and the ship’s International Maritime Organization (IMO) number which is unchanging throughout the ship’s life and uniquely identifies it.

·         Company.

·         The company shown in the vessel’s Safety Management Certificate or the party otherwise believed to be responsible for the safety of the ship at the time of inspection.

·         Classification Society.

·         The list shows the Classification Society responsible for classing the ship and not necessarily the party issuing and/or carrying out surveys for certificates relevant to the defect found.

·         Recognised Organisation.

·         The “organisation” - responsible for conducting the statutory surveys: and issuing statutory certificates, (on behalf of the Flag State).

·         Defects.

·         The list gives a summary of the main grounds for detention and includes information where the ship has been released to sail to another port for repairs.


DETENTIONS CARRIED OVER FROM PREVIOUS MONTHS

Date & Place of detention: 04/03/2010Lowestoft
Vessel Name: CIEN PORCIENTO (General Cargo)
GT: 106
IMO No: 8944446                                                             
Flag: Unregistered
Company: Open Window Inc
Classification Society: Unclassed
Recognised Organisation: Not applicable
Recognised Organisation for ISM: Not applicable
Summary: 30 deficiencies 7 grounds for detention

The vessel was detained in Lowestoft because the main fire pump was inoperative and there was no alternative fire pump outside the machinery space. There were insufficient liferafts, the sanitary water system was inoperative and there was no fresh running water to the galley, pantry and shower room. There were no nautical publications and charts were incomplete for the operational area.
Other deficiencies found were insufficient provisions for the intended voyage and medicines were out of date. In addition the following items were found to be missing:
distress flares; line throwing appliances; lifebuoys; life jackets with lights; immersion suits; satellite EPIRB (Emergency Positioning Indicating Radio Beacon); fire extinguishers and the fire hose nozzle.
The vessel was still detained at 31/03/2011.


Date & Place of detention 12/10/2010Penzance
Vessel Name: MY LADY NORMA 1
GT: 902
IMO: No:6523602                                                             
Flag:Kiribati
Company: Silvership Maritime Group
Classification Society: Not Classed
Summary: 1 deficiency, 1 ground for detention.

The vessel was detained in Penzance because the statutory certificates were not available on board ship.
The vessel was still detained at 31/03/2011.

Date & Place of detention: 08/11/2010Birkenhead
Vessel Name: MOST SKY General Cargo
GT: 1,972
IMO No:9389370                                                              
Flag: Panama
Company: ER Em Denizcilik
Classification Society:  Russian Maritime Register of Shipping (RMRS)
Summary: 12 deficiencies 4 grounds for detention

The vessel was detained in Birkenhead because the engine room was very dirty, there were fuel oil leaks and a major non conformity was identified with respect to the lack of maintenance of the ship and equipment.
Other deficiencies identified included: the crew/officers records of rest were not signed; the crew accommodation was no longer provided with steam heating; the
galley needed cleaning; there was insufficient fruit and vegetables on board; the crew showers and toilets were dirty and the shower curtains missing and the laundry washing facilities were inadequate. In addition the lifejacket lights were out of date; the aft deck was slippery underneath the deck generator and several fire doors were tied open.
The vessel was still detained at 31/03/2011.

Date & Place of detention: 28/02/2011 – Tyne
Vessel Name: COMARCO OSPREY (Tug)
GT: 116
IMO No7922776                                                               
Flag: Tanzania
Company: Evalend Shipping Co SA
Classification Society: International Register of Shipping (IRS)
Recognised Organisation: The Tanzania Zanaibar Register of Shipping
Summary: 31 deficiencies 3 grounds for detention

The vessel was detained in Tyne 12 days for because there was no rescue boat on board, the engine room deckhead and bulkhead was corroded through in several places into accommodation spaces and there was open cable penetration in the engine room. In addition there was no fire extinguishing system available in the engine room. Other serious deficiencies identified included: 3 life jackets were missing; four immersion suits were missing; 3 fire hoses were missing; the vessel had no medical equipment on board and the 7 crew did not have medical certificates.
The vessel was released on 11/03/2011.